The Wonderful Life Of Being A Lifeguard In Newport Beach

As featured on Forbes.com:

It’s a great town when the lifeguards make up to $211,912 in compensation with multi-million dollar lifetime pension payouts. Secretaries to the city bosses make nearly $100,000, refuse workers make three times the national median wage, and 31 city employees out-earn every governor of the fifty states.

We all missed the memo in high school – that job posting for the City of Newport Beach, California. If we had only known, many of us would have packed our bags and headed west for wealth and fortune on the California beach – as a lifeguard.

The lifeguards of Newport Beach have garnered Hollywood fame, pay exceeding six figures, and multi-million dollar (90 percent of salary) lifetime pensions kicking in as early as 50. It seems akin to winning the lottery against the pristine backdrop of bikinis, beautiful sunsets, and the Pacific Ocean sands. Their union negotiated perks include $400 per year in sunscreen allowance.

In 2007, the FOX prime-time hit program The O.C. frequently showcased the Newport Beach lifeguards.

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California bill would close ‘insidious’ wage gap between men and women

As reported by the San Jose Mercury News:

A pay equity bill expected to pass the California Assembly this afternoon would strengthen existing laws and “close that insidious wage gap” between men and women, a bipartisan group of women legislators said Monday.

If passed and signed by Gov. Jerry Brown, it would be the toughest equal pay law in the country and become what supporters hope will be a model for the rest of the country, said state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, D-Santa Barbara, chair of the California Legislative Women’s Caucus and author of SB358, the California Fair Pay Act.

The bill, supported by Republicans as well as the Chamber of Commerce, ensures that women are paid equally for work that is substantially similar to the work of their male colleagues. It also requires that women do not face retaliation if they discuss or ask how much their male colleagues are paid. …

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Assembly passes bill exempting students from exit exam

As reported by EdSource:

The state Assembly on Thursday approved a bill that would exempt seniors in the class of 2015 from the requirement to pass the California High School Exit Exam to graduate.

In a 69­-1 vote, Assembly members showed overwhelming support for Senate Bill 725, by Sen. Loni Hancock, D­-Oakland, which proposes to waive the requirement for the class of 2015 to pass the exam to receive diplomas.

Hancock gutted and amended her bill earlier this week to fast-­track the urgency legislation following media reports about students left in limbo when the state Department of Education canceled the July administration of the exam. …

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California drought impact pegged at $2.7 billion

As reported by the Sacramento Bee:

The drought is costing California about $2.7 billion this year, according to a new UC Davis study, although the statistics suggest the state’s overall economy can withstand the impact.

In their latest estimate of the four-year drought’s economic effects, professors at the university’s Center for Watershed Sciences said Tuesday the drought has reduced seasonal farm employment by 10,100 jobs this year. When indirect job losses are thrown in, including truck drivers, food processing workers and others partially dependent on farming, the impact on payrolls comes to 21,000.

At the same time, the study said farmers are holding up reasonably well in spite of significant water shortages and the fallowing of 542,000 acres of land. “Agriculture is very resilient because of the underground water,” said Richard Howitt, professor emeritus of agricultural and resource economics and a co-author of the report. “The economic impact is not as severe as it could be.”

Lawmakers to revive California right-to-die bill

As reported by the San Jose Mercury News:

SACRAMENTO — Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday will unveil plans to revive legislation that would give terminally ill Californians the right to die on their own terms.

Authors of the controversial “End of Life Option Act” shelved the measure last month when it became clear the bill didn’t have enough support to clear a key Assembly committee by a mid-July deadline. It was unclear Monday how the measure will advance now.

Senate Bill 128 would allow mentally competent, terminally ill patients to obtain a legal dose of medication from a physician to ease their suffering by ending their lives. It was inspired by Brittany Maynard, a UC Berkeley graduate who moved to Oregon to legally end her battle with aggressive terminal brain cancer. …

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Blame game as car break-ins escalate in S.F.

As reported by the San Francisco Chronicle:

An alarming 47 percent spike in San Francisco car break-ins in the first half of this year has prompted a blame game between police, prosecutors and politicians while repeat victims like Kelley Maulbetsch are left feeling exasperated and helpless.

When Maulbetsch walked to her car one morning last week in San Francisco’s Mission District, her usual upbeat demeanor quickly gave way to sour frustration. Someone had smashed a hole in the rear passenger-side window of her Volkswagen Jetta station wagon and made off with the paltry haul — two camping chairs and a music stand.

Pea-size pieces of glass were strewn about her car’s interior while chunks of the window still broke away from the hastily punched hole as she pulled up later that day to In and Out Auto Glass in the city’s Bayview district. …

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California right-to-die debate heads to court

As reported by the San Jose Mercury News:

SAN FRANCISCO — With efforts to legalize doctor-assisted suicide stalled in the California Legislature, the contentious issue of providing end of life treatment to the terminally ill is now headed back to the courts.

A San Francisco judge on Friday is expected to hear one of the leading legal challenges to California laws forbidding physicians from providing medical treatment that helps the dying end their lives.

Specifically, lawyers for several terminally ill patients and doctors who care for the terminally ill are moving to block enforcement of California laws that date back 140 years barring physician-assisted suicide. A San Diego judge last month rejected similar arguments, but right-to-die advocates say the San Francisco case tees up the central legal issues to resolve the question across California. …

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College dreams on hold after state cancels Exit Exam

As reported by the San Francisco Chronicle:

A last-minute decision by California education leaders cost scores of students around the state — including roughly 30 in San Francisco — a final chance to graduate from high school and go to a four-year college this fall.

The students haven’t passed a test that they can’t take anymore.

They were accepted to four-year colleges earlier this year, but first needed to pass the California High School Exit Exam to get a diploma. The problem? The state no longer offers the Exit Exam. …

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SF Sheriff says he didn’t know license had been suspended

As reported by the San Francisco Chronicle:

San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi’s driver’s license has been suspended since February for his failure to fulfill a legal obligation to tell the state Department of Motor Vehicles about a car accident in which he was involved, The Chronicle has learned.

A spokeswoman for Mirkarimi said Monday that the sheriff was unaware his license had been suspended until The Chronicle asked him about it.

Mirkarimi was in an accident in San Francisco on Oct. 2 in which one or both cars involved were damaged, according to DMV records. The records don’t specify who was at fault, but under state law it doesn’t matter — both drivers were obliged to file damage reports with the DMV if someone was hurt or if the damage amounted to at least $750.

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In a first, California agrees to pay for transgender inmate’s sex reassignment

As reported by the Los Angeles Times:

California is first in the nation to agree to pay for a transgender inmate’s sex reassignment operation, but the state’s settlement of a recent court case sidesteps the question of whether such surgery is a constitutional right.

The state concedes that Shiloh Quine, who entered the California prison system in 1980 as Rodney, suffers severe gender dysphoria that can be treated only by physically conforming her body to her psychological gender.

The agreement to settle Quine’s federal lawsuit seeking the surgery was announced late Friday, with a brief statement from the corrections department that “every medical doctor and mental health clinician who has reviewed this case, including two independent mental health experts, determined that this surgery is medically necessary for Quine.”

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