Gov. Jerry Brown’s last budget grows to $199 billion

Gov. Jerry Brown is using a surging, $8.8 billion surplus in his 16th and final year leading the state to stash billions of dollars in reserves.

He wants to put almost all of the additional money — $7.6 billion of it — into two reserve funds that combined would hold $17 billion a year from now if trends hold.

He warned at a press conference Friday where he unveiled his final budget for the 2018-19 financial year that a recession could be just around the corner and the state should avoid long-term commitments that it might not be able to afford in a downturn.

“This is a time to save for our future, not to make pricey promises we can’t keep. I said it before and I’ll say it again: Let’s not blow it now,” Brown said.

His plans calls for $137.6 billion in general fund spending and $199.3 billion in total spending. Those sums reflect the dramatic turnaround in the state’s fortunes since Brown took office in the throes of a recession eight years ago. …

Click here to read the full article from the Modesto Bee

Poll: Republican Travis Allen Won California Gubernatorial Debate

The debate is likely the last one before the June fifth primary. “Travis Allen wins #CAGovDebate!!!” Allen posted to his Twitter and Facebook pages along with a public opinion poll from NBC News.

The first poll had him at 43% and a second one had him at 72%

 

 

The media largely reported the debate as five-against-one with Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, the clear target as the race’s frontrunner.

“If you can’t trust Gavin with his best friend’s wife, how can you trust him with your state?” Allen reportedly asked, referring to an affair that came to light during Newsom’s time as Mayor of San Francisco.

Newsom responded that he had apologized for the relationship, saying, “I admitted it. I was wrong,” before suggesting that the attack was strange coming from a supporter of Donald Trump. “It’s hard, with respect, to hear from Mr. Allen, who is a devout supporter of Donald Trump, talk about the issue of sexual harassment,” Newsom said.

The event was moderated by NBC’s Chuck Todd and other issues covered included the gas tax and immigration.

Allen and John Cox were the sole Republicans on the Democrat-dominated debate. In addition to Newsom, the other Democrats included former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, State Treasurer John Chiang, and former State Superintendent of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin.

Allen said he would repeal Gov. Jerry Brown’s gas tax. “I am the original author of the repeal the gas tax,” he said, adding, “Jerry Brown lied to the California people in 2010 when he was elected on a simple promise of no new taxes without voter approval. He bribed four legislators a billion dollars of your tax money to pass the largest gas tax increase and car registration fee increase ever in California.”

Cox insisted, “I’m the chairman of the real gas tax repeal” and then went on to accuse Allen of stealing $300,000 of a contribution he received for his own campaign. Allen said, “I’d just like to respond to my angry opponent from Chicago. Let me be clear: I was the original author of the gas tax repeal.”

Allen and Cox stated they are against sanctuary cities and Newsom said he will fight and “push back against Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions and all of the others here who are trying to divide us through these games of political theater,” referring to Allen and Cox. Eastin also said she supports sanctuary cities and believes they are constitutional.

At one point, Cox said Trump’s border wall must be built because he does not “want to live next door to MS-13” gang members.

Newsom shot back saying, “This is the kind of rhetoric that has no place… we don’t tolerate diversity, we celebrate it.”

Villaraigosa noted that the “Dreamers didn’t come here on their own, They came here because their parents brought them here, and we’ve got to say that they have a right to have a legalized status.”

Todd concluded the debate by asking the candidates to weigh in on California’s top-two or “jungle” primary system which allows for the top two vote-getters to proceed to the General Election on November 7, regardless of political party.

“A Republican would be ideal in the general election,” Newsom reportedly said with a grin before looking over at Cox and Allen and adding, “Either one of these would do.”

“Be careful what you wish for, Gavin,” Cox shot back.

However, in his response to Todd, Allen said, “There’s only one Republican in the race anyway,” referring to Cox’s acknowledgment that he did not vote for Trump in 2016 and instead voted for Libertarian Gary Johnson; a decision he reportedly says he now regrets.

Adelle Nazarian is a politics and national security reporter for Breitbart News. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

This article was originally published by Breitbart.com/California

The privileged candidate: Why do we let Gavin Newsom get away with this?

Gavin newsomIf Gavin Newsom is elected governor of California without so much as a speed bump on his political journey of entitlement, it may take future social scientists to explain why current California voters were so willing to give this guy a pass on all the things we know about him.

Can’t you see this picture for what it really is?

The 50-year-old lieutenant governor and former mayor of San Francisco is the living embodiment of privilege, and people seem to be OK with that. He has white male privilege. Class privilege. Wealth privilege. The privilege of good looks.

All creates a Teflon exterior, protecting Newsom’s horrendous lapses of judgment and character, excusing his questionable background. It is simply accepted without eliciting the negative scrutiny that would dog or even derail lesser mortals.

If one of Newsom’s opponents – say, former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa or State Treasurer John Chiang – were bankrolled by one of the richest men in California for most of their lives, as Newsom has been by oil heir Gordon Getty, they would be answering for it every day on the campaign trail. A Mexican American guy or an Asian guy having a rich, white sugar daddy greasing the skids for them at every critical turn of their adult lives would be viewed with suspicion. But that is what Newsom had with Getty. …

Click here to read the full article from the Sacramento Bee

Orange County may play key midterm election role

Once coveted as a conservative bastion in liberal California, Orange County has become a last stand for the state’s Republicans.

Chased out of much of California by Democrats who hold every statewide office and a 39-14 advantage in U.S. House seats, the state’s GOP is trying to hold its ground in a historically Republican stronghold.

Republican elected officials in a string of cities and two counties — Orange and neighboring San Diego — have passed ordinances or taken other actions in opposition to the state’s so-called sanctuary law, enacted by the Democratic-run Legislature in response to Trump’s calls for more deportations and a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. …

Click here to read the full article from Fox News

John Cox Isn’t Sure Which State he is Running for Governor of!

Five things to watch at the California Republican Party convention this weekend

With a month to go before the June primary, the California Republican Party gathers in San Diego today for its 2018 convention, to rally the faithful and endorse candidates. (California Democrats met in February at the same spot, where an ideological fracture was on display, despite — or perhaps because of — the party’s utter domination of state politics.) Here are some key issues to watch for at the GOP confab, which lasts until Sunday. The Capitol Alert Twitter account will have updates throughout the weekend.

  1. Gubernatorial endorsement: Thanks to a rule change, the California Republican Party could for the first time this year back a candidate in the governor’s race before the primary. Party officials were hoping to avoid a repeat of the embarrassing 2016 scenario when no GOP hopeful made the runoff for U.S. Senate; now, they are facing the prospect of a similar outcome, with even more dire consequences. The good news is that a recent poll showed the major Republican contenders, Assemblyman Travis Allen and businessman John Cox, surging into a tight battle for second place. That should only amp up the stakes as they battle for delegates’ support before the Sunday vote. Reaching the 60 percent threshold necessary for the endorsement will be tough, but it could provide a significant boost for either Allen, whose fundraising has been unable to keep pace with Cox’s deep pockets, or Cox, who has not been embraced by party activists with the same fervor as Allen.
  2. Rhetoric: With Democrats across the country fired up this year to take on President Donald Trump, California Republicans are looking to rile up their own voters and avoid a blue wave in the November midterm election. Efforts are underway to qualify an initiative that would overturn the gas tax increase passed last year by Sacramento Democrats, while city and county officials across the state have been fanning a growing backlash to the “sanctuary state” law that limits the ability of California law enforcement to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement. What issues offer the most red meat for the delegates? …

Click here to read the full article from the Sacramento Bee

California sues to halt Trump’s plan to roll back vehicle emission standards

An angry Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday announced a lawsuit by California and 16 other states against the Trump administration to stop it from rolling back aggressive national fuel economy standards championed by the state.

In stinging comments at the Capitol, Brown said actions of the Trump administration were “so outrageous,” adding “Trump is definitely running a one-man demolition derby on science, the Clean Air Act and a lot of things we are trying to do.”

Brown called Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt “Outlaw Pruitt,” and accused him of “breaking the law.”

“He’s flouting the Clean Air Act and the legitimate needs and well-being of the American people,” the governor said. …

Click here to read the full article from the L.A. Times

Homeless may get mobile showers at Los Angeles Metro stations

sanfranciscohomelessAs the homeless population continues to grow in Los Angeles, the agency that operates public transportation in the county is considering putting showers in or near some of its train stations in an effort to promote hygiene.

Metro’s Board of Directors unanimously approved a motion on Thursday following a four-month study to examine a pilot hygiene and mobile shower program, which would also examine incorporating public restrooms at all new rail stations on the system.

“I hope that when we look at this, it’s a first start, it’s about a humanitarian issue in my opinion because we do have a very diverse population that uses our rail and bus services and our hubs,” Metro Director and Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda Solis told board members.

Solis, who spearheaded the study for the pilot program, said the program would be collaborated with the Los Angeles County’s Office of Homeless Initiative, Department of Public Health, Department of Public Works, and other relevant departments. The pilot program, if adopted, would first roll out at the Westlake/MacArthur Park and North Hollywood stations. …

Click here to read the full article from Fox News

Five Things You Need to Know about John Cox

Here are five things you need to know about John Cox, excerpted and abridged from the Sacramento Bee, January 4, 2018:

  1.  He didn’t vote for Donald Trump. Cox, whose campaign slogan, “Clean out the Barn” is similar to President Donald Trump’s “Drain the Swamp,” didn’t vote for the GOP nominee. Cox supported libertarian Gary Johnson.
  2. Cox grew up and spent much of his life in Chicago.  He’s run unsuccessfully for Congress, the U.S. Senate and Cook County Recorder of Deeds. He also had an aborted presidential campaign ahead of the 2008 race.
  3. When he ran for president in the 2008 race, 10 Republicans made the cut for the GOP debate in South Carolina. Cox was not one of them.  [Editor’s note.  When Cox ran for the Republican nomination and appeared on the ballot in California, he finished 11th with less than one-tenth of 1% of the GOP vote.]
  4. Cox also unsuccessfully sought to place an initiative on the 2016 ballot requiring candidates to declare their top 10 donors in campaign advertisements. Elected officials would have also been required to wear badges detailing their biggest benefactors, much like NASCAR drivers.
  5. He’s the only Republican in the race who opposes the death penaltyJohn Cox

Trump girds for war with California over fuel economy

traffic-los-angelesThe Trump administration is speeding toward all-out war with California over fuel economy rules for cars and SUVs, proposing to revoke the state’s long-standing authority to enforce its own tough rules on tailpipe emissions.

The move forms a key part of a proposal by Trump’s environmental and transportation agencies to roll back the nation’s fuel economy standards. The agencies plan to submit the proposal to the White House for review within days.

The plan would freeze fuel economy targets at the levels required for vehicles sold in 2020, and leave those in place through 2026, according to federal officials who have reviewed it. That would mark a dramatic retreat from existing law, which aimed to get the nation’s fleet of cars and light trucks to an average fuel economy of 55 miles per gallon by 2025. Instead of average vehicle fuel economy ratcheting up to that level, it would stall out at 42 miles per gallon.

That would constitute the single biggest step the administration has taken to undermine efforts to combat climate change. …

Click here to read the full article from The Virginian Pilot