See the biggest spenders in California’s prop battles

Californians are voting on 12 propositions, but not all are funded equally. Just take a look at that fat slab of lilac in the graphic below.

No surprise for even the most dimly engaged Californians who have been bombarded with ads for weeks now: Funding for Proposition 22, a measure to exempt gig-economy companies from a new state labor law, dwarfs just about everything else. To date, its yes campaign has raised nearly $188 million. That’s $3 of every $10 that’s been spent for or against any proposition on the November 2020 ballot. 

Other big-money battles:

And if you don’t see Propositions 17 and 18, look closer — they’re there, as slivers. Evidently no deep-pocketed interests want to fight over voting rights for parolees and 17-year-olds. …

Click here to read the full article from CalMatters.org

Comments

  1. QUESTION:
    What makes you think that ballot measures above will be truthfully reported as voted?
    When it comes to fraud and taxes, should we be thinking that these measures will PASS, whether or not they had vote count? With mail in ballots everywhere and fraud everywhere associated with them, how can we expect anything less than fraudulent ballot count in California?

    • Adam James says

      Hi, where is the voter fraud occurring? I’ve been looking for credible sources of the fraud that everyone’s talking about, but can’t find it. Also, do you have any studies you can share on how mail in ballots are more fraudulent than other forms of voting? Thanks in advance.

  2. NO MORE MONEY FOR PENSIONS…VOTE RED
    RED= REMOVE EVERY DEMIOCRAT

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