Elias: Real Estate Prices Driving Moves From State–Nobody Surprised

The Guv wants you to pay $5.2 billion more in car/gas taxes to pay for the misuse—by him—of current gas tax and transportation bond money.  Senator Hertzberg wants you to pay a sales tax on your use of attorneys, CPA’s and other services.  City by city are creating a soda tax.  A bill in the legislature—at the urging of San Fran and LA is asking for permission to create a CITY income tax.  Then you have the highest cost of rentals in the nation in California along with the highest cost of homes.  We also have among the nations highest gas and sales tax.  Can you afford to live in California—between the cost of government and housing—do you have money for a hot dog?

“Millenials may be willing to double- and triple-up so they can live where they like despite high rents, but that same cost factor is driving an unprecedented share of them away from California, says a new study from the Apartment List website

When they get ready to buy, those same millennials are forced out of high-priced cities like San Francisco, Santa Barbara and the coastal parts of Los Angeles, adds the CoreLogic data analysis firm.

This scene is not unique to California’s higher-priced cities, but also occurs in New York, Chicago’s tonier areas, Boston and Washington, D.C. But it could lead to serious problems for California companies wanting to hire or retain the brightest members of the young-adult generation.

Is it possible that the young have decided the quality of life is more than solar panels?  That finally they realize it is government and government policy causing them to feel like sardines?  They believe they can not change the policies, so instead go to free States, like Texas, to have a great quality of life.

Pension money

Real Estate Prices Driving Moves From State

By Tom Elias, Santa Monica Mirror, 3/27/17

If you’re a millennial, now aged 18 to 35, there’s a good chance the only major city in California you’re very much interested in moving to is San Francisco. That’s because it’s largely walkable, with plenty of amenities like singles bars and gorgeous parks. And also a lot of high-paying, high-tech jobs if you qualify.

Millenials may be willing to double- and triple-up so they can live where they like despite high rents, but that same cost factor is driving an unprecedented share of them away from California, says a new study from the Apartment List website

When they get ready to buy, those same millennials are forced out of high-priced cities like San Francisco, Santa Barbara and the coastal parts of Los Angeles, adds the CoreLogic data analysis firm.

This scene is not unique to California’s higher-priced cities, but also occurs in New York, Chicago’s tonier areas, Boston and Washington, D.C. But it could lead to serious problems for California companies wanting to hire or retain the brightest members of the young-adult generation.

In San Francisco and Silicon Valley, where prices have skied in the last three years, 50 out of every 100 households that apply for new home mortgages are buying in nearby counties like Alameda and Contra Costa, where prices are significantly lower. Contra Costa’s median sales price over the last year, for example, was less than half San Francisco’s for comparable properties.

Now this problem is spreading to nearby Alameda County, home to cities like Oakland and Berkeley, where 34 percent of home loan applications are for areas even farther from the Bay Area’s urban core.

In Los Angeles, meanwhile, the millennial population decreased by 7.4 percent between 2005 and 2015, with many 18-to-35s decamping to places like Austin, Tex., Charlotte and Houston. The technology industry is strong in those places, but real estate prices and rents are half or less than for comparable properties in the most trendy parts of Los Angeles.

Overall, says CoreLogic, home prices were up 71 percent in California in that time, with the median statewide home price in mid-2016 reaching $428,000.

There is no backlash yet, mostly because of foreign buyers, who tend to be among their countries’ affluent, seeking a safe place to invest their riches. The leading buyers of this type have lately been mainland Chinese.

“This makes it harder for the average person to make a living (in California),” said Sam Khater, a CoreLogic economist. “That means less teachers, fire fighters, retail workers and more. It’s causing the entire state to be more expensive.”

Or, as a Silicon Valley executive complained earlier this year, “I pay some of my people with master’s degrees $70,000 and $80,000 a year and they still have no hope of buying a house anywhere near where they work.”

Some locales are trying to compensate for this by subsidizing teacher housing, from kindergarten to the college level. For sure, real estate prices are a recruiting barrier when companies and schools seek to hire top talent from places like Texas and Arizona, where median home prices are barely half California’s level.

Some places are trying to solve the problem with affordable housing, generally apartments or condominium units that builders are required to include in new developments along with market-rate housing. This kind of affordable property usually bears a resale price limit, with city and school employees often getting priority on the long waiting lists for them.

But those same new developments, when placed in already crowded urban areas, add to traffic volume which is not notably reduced even by new public transit that has opened in parts of Los Angeles and other areas.

It’s a real quandary for California: The state needs talented young workers to fuel its innovative industries, but even those who earn more than $200,000 yearly have difficulty qualifying for mortgages on homes selling for more than $1 million, increasingly common in this state.

But acting to artificially reduce real estate prices would impact the resources of millions of Californians who have lived here for a generation or two.

So far, there is no answer to this dilemma, which sees more and more companies forced to open satellite facilities in more affordable states.

Cal POLY SLO: Whining And Crying Over a Free Election

The snowflakes on the campus of Cal Poly SLO do not understand what they are demanding.  They want a reporting system for the “hate” on the campus.  So, when a professor calls Trump supporters Nazi’s, a complaint can be made, then made public and embarrass them for their bigotry and hatred.  If the student government passed a resolution against President Trump, that would be hate speech—reported to the authorities.  The Left can not afford to win this battle—by winning they are the one’s exposed as haters and dangerous.

“Students are demanding that California Polytechnic University institute a “discrimination reporting” system to protect them once Donald Trump becomes president.

“Across the country, instances of hate, bigotry, and violent attacks against the most vulnerable communities in our country have been on the rise—and our institution is not poised to address this well,” the Cal Poly Students for a Quality Education group declares in an open letter to the Cal Poly administration.

The OC Coast College professor in her human sexuality class claimed the November 8 election was “an act of terrorism”.  She would be reported.  The nut case Hunter College teacher that exploded and publicly announced his goal was to HARASS Ivanka Trump, he would be reported and lose his job (that would be a good thing—he is not emotionally equipped to be in polite society).  The snowflakes need to get therapy before they became victims of their meltdowns.

donald-trump-3

Students demand bias reporting system before Trump takes office

Elias Atienza, Campus Reform,  12/21/16

  Students are demanding that California Polytechnic University institute a “discrimination reporting” system to protect them once Donald Trump becomes president.

  The campaign has been ongoing for more than a year, but the students are expressing a renewed sense of urgency due to fears that “actual or perceived” bias incidents will increase once Trump takes office.

Students are demanding that California Polytechnic University institute a “discrimination reporting” system to protect them once Donald Trump becomes president.

“Across the country, instances of hate, bigotry, and violent attacks against the most vulnerable communities in our country have been on the rise—and our institution is not poised to address this well,” the Cal Poly Students for a Quality Education group declares in an open letter to the Cal Poly administration.

“A reminder: when we organize, we win.”

The letter then points out that “dozens of higher educational institutions across the United States have embraced the now common practice of providing accessible avenues for reporting instances of racism, transphobia, homophobia, Islamaphobia, ect. [sic] on our campuses,” and lambasts Cal Poly for failing to provide “easy to understand online forms” for students to report such incidents.

According to the letter, Cal Poly “simply lists the contact information of existing, federally mandated reporting processes—while other institutions listed offer dedicated online reporting forms, which trigger their own respective investigations.”

The reason for the students’ urgency, they explain, is their fear that the incoming Trump administration will lead to an uptick in “actual or perceived” bias incidents.

“Under Trump’s administration—it is critical that students have accessible and reliable ways to report instances of bias based on perceived or actual race, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, ability, immigration status, religion, etc.,” the letter asserts. “As a community, we need to stand strong and look out for each other, while holding those who subscribe to bigotry and hate accountable. A reminder: when we organize, we win.”

The letter also comes with a survey section for anyone in the Cal Poly community who is interested in signing on to the petition.

“Do you think students should have accessible reporting avenues given an instance of bias or discrimination based on race, sexual orientation, immigration status, national origin, religion, etc?” the questionnaire asks before polling respondents on whether they are aware that the campaign has been ongoing for more than a year, and asking whether readers would like to volunteer their support for the effort.

Campus Reform reached out to Cal Poly to ask whether the administration has any response to the letter, but did not receive a reply in time for publication.

Democrat Secretary of State Caught LYING About Vote Fraud in California

A reporter called me yesterday about the Trump charge of illegal voting in California.  He did not know of any.  I had to remind him the CBS in LA found hundreds of dead people, dead for years, voting constantly since 2004 in LA County.  Then I had to remind him that in San Pedro 83 absentee ballots were delivered to one apartment.  In California is you see an illegal alien voting and report it to the Poll Captain, YOU are in trouble with the law and the illegal alien is allowed to vote.  Without ID, there is no way to know how many, not if, crooked votes are cast.

“California Secretary of State Alex Padilla on Sunday dismissed Donald Trump’s charges of voter fraud in California as “absurd” and “unbecoming” of a President-elect.

“It appears that Mr. Trump is troubled by the fact that a growing majority of Americans did not vote for him,” said Padilla, who supervises California’s election results. “His unsubstantiated allegations of voter fraud in California and elsewhere are absurd.”

Mr. Padilla—have you investigated the LA County Registrar of Voters?  Have you asked for an audit of the voting rolls in the counties?  How many dead people are sent ballots and vote them each year?  The problem is that Trump is calling you out as either lazy, a fraud or corrupt.  Prove him wrong—audit the voting rolls, prosecute the illegal voters and fire the Registrars of Voters that are either incompetent and/or corrupt—you can start with Dean Logan in L.A.

ballots-vote

Trump’s Vote Fraud Charge ‘Absurd’ Says California Secretary of State

by Chris Jennewein, Times of San Diego,  11/27/16

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla on Sunday dismissed Donald Trump’s charges of voter fraud in California as “absurd” and “unbecoming” of a President-elect.

“It appears that Mr. Trump is troubled by the fact that a growing majority of Americans did not vote for him,” said Padilla, who supervises California’s election results. “His unsubstantiated allegations of voter fraud in California and elsewhere are absurd.”

“His reckless tweets are inappropriate and unbecoming of a President-elect,” Padilla added.

Trump tweeted Sunday that he believes there was “serious voter fraud in Virginia, New Hampshire and California” and claimed he would have won the popular vote except for “millions of people who voted illegally.”

Although Trump won the electoral vote, he trails Democrat Hillary Clinton in the popular vote by more than 2 million.

A recount is underway in Wisconsin, but not in any other states, and Clinton conceded the election on Nov. 9.

Kanye perpetuates colorism with latest project. “Colorism”

“Colorism” is a new word—it is used to connote the racist view that color matters more than character.  Kanye West is a singer and fashion designer he wanted to do a fashion show and did not send out a notice wanting Asian models, or white models—he wanted women of color that were of a mixed race.  So what?  Did I mention that West is black (and the husband of Kim Kardashian)?  Who cares.  He is creating jobs for people of color.

Sadly, at San Fran State University, where this opinion piece was published, believes only folks of the “right” color have the right to work.  This modern day racism is of the same kind promoted by the KKK—shame on these students promoting a vile racist organizations’ values as if a University should be promoting hatred and bigotry.

“Earlier this month, Kanye West tweeted a casting call asking for “multiracial women only,” that caused a stir among fans and critics alike. People took to twitter and the real world to criticize the statement that left entire communities out to dry.

“Kanye West asking for multiracial models kind of sends an anti-Black message,” said Andrew Jolivette, an American Indian professor at SF State who identifies as Louisiana Creole. “Saying he wants mixed performers sends the idea that Black is not beautiful.”

Yup, to the racists, hiring black models of a mixed race background is racist—but hiring model of only a black background is Progressive.  The KKK made excuses for their racism as well.  While I am not a fan of Kanye West music or family connections, he is a free American and has the right to take economic risks in the fashion industry and hire whoever he wants as a model.

Photo courtesy pd2020@sbcglobal.net, flickr

Photo courtesy pd2020@sbcglobal.net, flickr

Kanye perpetuates colorism with latest project

Kevin Vega, Golden State Express,  9/21/16

Earlier this month, Kanye West tweeted a casting call asking for “multiracial women only,” that caused a stir among fans and critics alike. People took to twitter and the real world to criticize the statement that left entire communities out to dry.

“Kanye West asking for multiracial models kind of sends an anti-Black message,” said Andrew Jolivette, an American Indian professor at SF State who identifies as Louisiana Creole. “Saying he wants mixed performers sends the idea that Black is not beautiful.”

Being a non-Black person of color myself, I can’t speak for what is and what is not anti-Black; however, sentiments like West’s come off as biased.

West should know better than to further restrict people of color from their already very limited opportunities in the fashion world. The Fashion Spot reported that in the most recent fashion season only 25 percent of models cast in shows were models of color, while the remaining 75 percent were white.

Being such a successful Black man in pop culture has not been easy for West, from calling out George Bush during his presidency on live television to becoming public enemy number one after interrupting Taylor Swift. I’m disappointed and surprised that he’d use his platform to perpetuate something as detrimental as colorism, where lighter skin is favored over darker skin.

Preferring multiracial people to those who are not multiracial leaves out entire communities of people because they don’t measure up to the light skin standard West is aiming for. The lightest skin in minority communities typically exists in those who have a parent from a minority community (usually one with a darker skin tone) and a white parent.

It’s important to note that though half-White half-minorities have White privilege, they also are minorities, so their lives aren’t exactly easy. They still experience racism from those around them. But when Kanye and others continue to uplift half-White biracial individuals while also alienating monoracial individuals, the conversation of having a half-White privilege is one that needs to be had.

With Colin Kapernick refusing to stand during the national anthem and multiple killings of unarmed Black people by policemen raising racial tension in America, West’s request adds to this tension. Asking for “multiracial models only” implies that there’s something wrong with being unambiguously Black, Latino, Asian, or a person of any color that is not White.

“I think often the problem and what most people think of mixed is that most people always assume mixed is white and something else,” Jolivette said. “They forget that people aren’t trying to be better than somebody or that people don’t want to be something else.”

Even within minority communities being biracial will get you further than those who are not biracial because of the privilege that being white grants you. Multiracial individuals may share oppression with their monoracial community members, but having lighter skin grants them access to opportunities that they may not have had otherwise – like avoiding punishment by school officials or having less time in punishment while in elementary school.

West’s casting call also begs the question: where is the representation for double minority individuals? What about multiracial individuals who are half-Black and half-Latino? Or half-Latino and half-Asian? Or any combination that does not involve White? Do these types of models and people have the same kind of privilege that light skinned biracial people have, or are they just as underrepresented as monoracial individuals?

Artists like West and other trend setters should refrain from perpetuating industry standards that favor White individuals. Instead of following racist ideals they should use their power and influence to diversify the White-dominated entertainment industry.

Why Are So Few People Paying Attention to Forced Live Organ Harvesting in China?

Donald Trump is talking about the trade imbalance between the United States and China.  Some have spoken about the lack of civil rights in China—and the fact that China decides what can be on Facebook, Google and the Internet.  It is a totalitarian regime—anybody disagree?  Now, the abuse of humans has become more specific—China is forcing the harvesting of organs from LIVE people.

“A government killing their own citizens for their political or spiritual beliefs for profit? The crime is so horrific it almost defies belief.

In Hard to Believe, two-time Emmy-award-winner Ken Stone highlights both the atrocity and the world’s lack of response by investigating why a 2014 U.S. House Resolution condemning the crime of forced organ harvesting from tens of thousands of Chinese prisoners of conscience was proposed but never voted on.”

This is a documentary you must see.  We need to understand the issue and ask why the State Department and the White House has been silent.  See the documentary and get a better understanding of the problem.  Silence is no longer an option.

jerry brown china

Why Are So Few People Paying Attention to Forced Live Organ Harvesting in China?

Award-Winning Documentary Investigates One of the Most Horrifying Crimes of Our Time and the World’s Tepid Response

Swoop Films,  8/5/16

A government killing their own citizens for their political or spiritual beliefs for profit? The crime is so horrific it almost defies belief.

In Hard to Believe, two-time Emmy-award-winner Ken Stone highlights both the atrocity and the world’s lack of response by investigating why a 2014 U.S. House Resolution condemning the crime of forced organ harvesting from tens of thousands of Chinese prisoners of conscience was proposed but never voted on.

Stone explains that he was well into his second decade as an independent producer who had never heard of the term “live organ harvesting” when he was first approached by Swoop Films producer, Kay Rubacek, to do a documentary about the subject.

At the time, he had virtually no knowledge of the Chinese spiritual practice called Falun Gong or why its practitioners were targeted by Chinese authorities. Initially skeptical, he soon realized he had stumbled on a gruesome murder mystery that virtually no one was paying attention to – until his film was released on PBS in 2015.

After more than sixty screenings worldwide and eleven awards, Resolution H.R. 343 was unanimously passed in Congress in 2015 condemning organ harvesting in China.

What Daily Mail calls “the first sustained examination into why the world is so willing to turn a blind eye to one of the most catastrophic human rights violations in our time” has now been broadcast on America’s PBS TV stations, translated into 12 languages, and screened in ten countries, including in Parliament House and numerous cinemas, colleges, film festivals, and other venues.

Top U.S. colleges have purchased educational licenses for the film for use in libraries and classrooms, and the film is newly available on iTunes, Google Play, and Vimeo for online streaming or digital download.

Stone comments, “The story I wanted to tell was why no one was paying attention. It reminded me of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., writing about the civil rights era in the United States: ‘History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.’ One of the lessons from Hard to Believe is that so many good people – so many of us – haven’t just been silent, we haven’t even paid attention. I hope this film prompts a few more people to do so.”

Hard to Believe has received the following awards:

  • Winner of Best Documentary, 2016 Hoboken International Film Festival;
  • Winner of Outstanding Achievement, 2015 Global Film Awards Humanitarian Award;
  • Winner of Outstanding Achievement, Accolade Global Film Competition 2015 Humanitarian;
  • Six Awards of Excellence from the 2015 Accolade Global Film Competition in the categories of Documentary Program, Social Change, Religion, Ethics, Health, and Medicine;
  • 2015 IndieFEST Global Film Award in the categories of Liberation and Social Justice

Hard to Believe dives into a topic that is utterly disturbing for the medical profession and society in the twenty-first century. The true horror of this crime is summed up in the few words of Chinese surgeon Dr. Enver Tohti: “Remember… nothing happened today.” ~ Torsten Trey, M.D., Ph.D., Executive Director, Doctors Against Forced Organ Harvesting (DAFOH)

AUTHOR: Two-time Emmy award-winner Ken Stone spent twenty years in American broadcast newsrooms, the bulk of that time at public television stations. His U.S. national awards include a duPont Silver Baton (Columbia University’s broadcast equivalent of its Pulitzer), an Emmy Award, and a Gabriel Award for The Next Mission (2010) and an Emmy Award for Fundamental Rights: The Pennsylvania Abortion Control Act (1992).

=============================
Click here to view complete information in PDF or see attached
=============================

Hard to Believe by Ken Stone; Produced by Ken Stone, Irene Slber, and Kay Rubacek; Swoop Films, LLC; Category: Medical Ethics, Education, Law, Philosophy, Human Rights, Home DVD: 978-0692522844, $19.99; Availability: DVD (Comes with bonus 32-page full-color film booklet) HardtoBelieveMovie.com; Digital Online Streaming (VOD Video on Demand): iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, Google Play, Vimeo

 

Game Changer: World’s Leading Medical Group Backs E-Cigarettes

e-cigaretteOne of the world’s most prestigious medical organizations has delivered a groundbreaking 200-page report that supports e-cigarettes as a tool to quit smoking and demolishes several vaping myths in the process.

The Royal College of Physicians (RCP), the most respected medical institution in the United Kingdom, concluded e-cigarettes are 95 percent safer than regular cigarettes and are likely to be hugely beneficial to public health.

Titled “Nicotine without smoke: tobacco harm reduction,” the report is one of the most comprehensive ever published examining e-cigarettes and could be a game changer for health officials and politicians all over the world. The RCP’s seminal 1962 report, which demonstrated the link between smoking, lung disease and bronchitis spurred the U.S. Surgeon General to publish the historic 1964 “Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States.”

The RCP’s new report tears apart scare stories, including the ever-more popular idea that vaping is somehow a gateway to smoking. “To date, there is no evidence that any of these processes is occurring to any significant degree in the UK,” said the report’s authors. (RELATED: CDC Admits, No ‘Concrete’ Evidence E-Cigarettes Are Gateway To Smoking)

The authors are emphatic there is no evidence e-cigarette use has in any way “renormalized” smoking. “None of these products has to date attracted significant use among adult never-smokers, or demonstrated evidence of significant gateway progression into smoking among young people.”

One of the most damaging myths about e-cigarettes that caught fire in 2015 was e-cigarettes don’t actually help smokers quit. (RELATED: Study Claiming E-Cigarettes Make Quitting Harder Exposed As ‘Unscientific Hatchet Job’)

Contrary to the claims of some public health activists in the U.S., the RCP is clear: e-cigarettes can help smokers kick their habit for good. “Among smokers, e-cigarette use is likely to lead to quit attempts that would not otherwise have happened, and in a proportion of these to successful cessation. In this way, e-cigarettes can act as a gateway from smoking.” (RELATED: Study Finds E-Cigarettes Raise Chances Of Quitting, ‘Can Save Lives’)

The RCP does not claim vaping is totally safe, as vapers inhale nicotine and flavorings. But they conclude any risk to vapers is likely to be “very small, and substantially smaller than that arising from tobacco smoking.”

Concurring with a previous report by Public Health England, RCP believes the health risks to vapers is unlikely to reach more than five percent of the risks associated with smoking. The report also warns overzealous policymakers to resist the temptation to regulate e-cigarettes in a way that would stifle innovation or discourage use.

“This report lays to rest almost all of the concerns over these products, and concludes that, with sensible regulation, electronic cigarettes have the potential to make a major contribution towards preventing the premature death, disease and social inequalities in health that smoking currently causes in the UK,” said Professor John Britton, chair of the RCP’s Tobacco Advisory Group. “Smokers should be reassured that these products can help them quit all tobacco use forever,” he added.

Those most applauding the study’s conclusions are e-cig groups who have been fighting an onslaught of attacks from politicians and dubious public health researchers. (RELATED: Read The Stunning Correction This Scientist Dropped On Her Own Anti-E-Cig Study)

“When the RCP told the truth about cigarettes in 1962, it took two years for the U.S. government to play catch up and release its own report. It should not take two months, let alone two years, for American public health authorities to correct their past misstatements about vaping. The FDA and CDC must seriously consider the RCP’s guidance before moving forward on any new regulations or public campaigns about smoke-free nicotine products,” said Gregory Conley, president of the American Vaping Association.

“For those in mainstream tobacco control, the question for them is, how can you dismiss this report out of hand? The authors are credible experts without financial conflicts of interest in tobacco or vapor products. At some point, these groups will have to realize that the science has long outpaced their rhetoric,” Conley added.

Cancer charities added their voices to the chorus of praise for the RCP’s report. “This important report is an accurate summary of the latest scientific evidence on e-cigarettes and will help dispel the increasingly common misconception that they’re as harmful as smoking. They’re not,” said Cancer Research UK’s director of prevention Alison Cox.

Follow Guy on Twitter

Originally published by the Daily Caller News Foundation

Bond/Tax Orgy Grows in San Fran Area: $500 Million to “Restore” Wetlands

You can never have enough bonds or taxes when you are an environmentalist or lover of big government (Democrat).  The November ballot, so far, State and local, including interest costs, has over $300 billion in tax increases and bond measures to sell the suckers—ur, public.

“While the purchase was enabled by federal and state agencies, along with private donations, there was never a revenue source for the actual restoration of the land. Now, a nine-county ballot measure seeks to change that. By asking for a $12 annual tax on every parcel, the San Francisco Bay Area Restoration Authority is seeking a total of $500 million, or $25 million a year, for restoration projects and real ecological benefits.”

The Bay Area already has the highest housing energy and water costs in the State and arguably the worst traffic on streets and freeways.  Yet some wetland seems to be more important than the survival of the families of the area.  That could be why the middle class has fled the area—that is good news for Texas—and terrible news for the future of the Bay Area and California.

government-vote

Editorial: vote Yes on Measure AA

San Mateo Daily Journal,  4/22/16

 

 

In 2003, 15,100 acres of salt ponds were purchased from Cargill Inc. with an aim to eventually restore them to tidal wetlands. For decades, those lands that were taken from the Bay were used for salt production and the purchase was part of a larger effort to restore that land back to its natural state.

The project has several goals, to bring back habitat that would allow for dwindling wildlife to flourish again and to also provide ways for the area’s water quality to improve while also creating better flood control.

While the purchase was enabled by federal and state agencies, along with private donations, there was never a revenue source for the actual restoration of the land. Now, a nine-county ballot measure seeks to change that. By asking for a $12 annual tax on every parcel, the San Francisco Bay Area Restoration Authority is seeking a total of $500 million, or $25 million a year, for restoration projects and real ecological benefits.

Though the San Francisco Bay is the defining characteristic of this region, it historically receives disproportionately less federal funding compared to other significant national bodies of water. Puget Sound, the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay receive between five and 60 times more federal support than the Bay. Though there has been some effort by local federal legislators to correct that, but so far there has been little to show. This measure would be able to produce the money needed to begin many of the projects and could be used to leverage additional state and federal funds.

While many of those projects are in the South Bay, they would help in assuring the entire Bay stays healthy and also ensure that decades of development, diking and fill would be rectified. There are also opportunities in San Mateo County for projects, including the restoration of marsh land near San Francisquito Creek and even some improvements at Coyote Point.

Restoring Bay marsh land is key to preventing flooding, reducing pollution and creating new recreation areas for all to enjoy. The purchase in 2003 was a tremendous step toward the potential for this land, and other areas, to be restored. This nine-county proposal, Measure AA, now provides the much-needed funding for its restoration. This has been a long thought-out process with tremendous benefits for everyone in the Bay Area with just a small amount of revenue provided by each and every property owner in nine counties. It deserves your support.

 

Cal Berkeley has $150 Million DEFICIT—not a Media Story

The radical indoctrination camp known as Cal Berkeley has a $150 million debt.  This is the University that uses gender based departments to teach the superiority of one gender over another.  Cal also has ethnic departments teaching that white people are bad and that black races are superior in black classes, Hispanics are superior in Hispanic courses, etc.  Bigotry and hatred are the roles of these department.  Try claiming all lives matter in a Black History class and see if you survive the 45 minutes.

“Chancellor Nicholas Dirks opened the meeting with a statement on the campus’s larger financial problems. The budget deficit is $150 million this year, Dirks said at the meeting, and without immediate action, the deficit could grow by another $50 million by July 2017. Present efforts will reduce the deficit by $85 million by next year, he added.

Dirks said the administration has already begun to take action — such as the recent creation of the Office of Strategic Initiatives — and is well into the process of balancing the budget within the next five years.

Instead of ending the indoctrination and bigotry they are firing 500 workers—just like Leftists—make the people suffer while they preach chaos and radicalization.  Seriously, when will the workers understand they have been used by radical for political purposes?

UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley faculty hold special meeting on campus deficit, academic realignment

 

By Sareen Habeshian, Daily Californian,  4/13/16

Campus to eliminate 500 jobs over next 2 years as part of deficit reduction UC Berkeley faculty hold emergency meeting on sexual harassment handling Update to campus Academic Realignment Initiative outlines potential cost-cutting changes

The Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate held a special meeting Tuesday on the campus’s financial deficit and the faculty’s role in progress with academic restructuring.

Faculty gathered in the campus’s Booth Auditorium after 40 senate members petitioned to hold an open discussion on efforts by the administration to academically realign the campus by reorganizing certain colleges and staffing structures — a decision that has elicited criticism from the campus community, including faculty and students.

Chancellor Nicholas Dirks opened the meeting with a statement on the campus’s larger financial problems. The budget deficit is $150 million this year, Dirks said at the meeting, and without immediate action, the deficit could grow by another $50 million by July 2017. Present efforts will reduce the deficit by $85 million by next year, he added.

Dirks said the administration has already begun to take action — such as the recent creation of the Office of Strategic Initiatives — and is well into the process of balancing the budget within the next five years.

“We know we have to do a great deal more,” Dirks said at the meeting.

The administration came under fire in February for considering the dissolution of the College of Chemistry — a plan that has since been abandoned — as a potential strategic initiative to remedy the campus’s growing deficit. Dirks also sent a memo to campus employees Wednesday announcing that administrative restructuring may lead to cutting staff by 500 positions.

At Wednesday’s meeting, however, Dirks brought up his proposal of a faculty-led working group that would produce reports by January regarding the future of the campus’s academic structure.

In the nearly two-hour open comment period, about 25 faculty members spoke, many of whom criticized the administration’s lack of transparency in the academic realignment process. Many said they were frustrated that their input, as faculty, had not previously been considered in the process.

“Why are these things secret in a place that has the motto ‘Fiat Lux’?” said Louise Fortmann, a campus professor of environmental science, policy and management,  at the meeting.

Campus ESPM professor Carolyn Merchant, an organizer of the petition, called for a “revolution in cost reduction” through reducing not only administrative pay but positions, among other methods. She also called on the administration to “recreate itself as a lean, efficient, moral entity devoted to the public trust.”

Allen Goldstein, professor of ESPM and civil and environmental engineering, urged the administration to stop the process of academic realignment altogether. He called the process “a destructive force within our community” and said the Academic Senate should further discuss the campus’s initiatives to alleviate its financial straits.

Some speakers also called on the administration to seek out alternative sources of funding rather than cut costs through academic realignment.

“We can’t cut our way to prosperity,” said mechanical engineering professor Panayiotis Papadopoulos at the meeting.

UC Berkeley spokesperson Dan Mogulof emphasized that the campus cannot adjust its structures and finances without the the input of faculty, students, staff and alumni, among others.

“Meetings like this are extremely important, and perspective of faculty have to be taken into account if we’re going to succeed in our efforts,” Mogulof said.

 

More Misdirection On Our Plan For California Water

DroughtLet’s just get right to it. Appearing in yesterday’s Sacramento Bee, is an editorial titled, “GOP should drop effort to gut Endangered Species Act.” And like past editorials on this topic, the misrepresentation is as blatant as the Kern River is dry — and both are damaging for our state.

This “effort” the editorial board refers to is just the latest in numerous efforts from the House to get the Senate to act on California water. When Republicans regained the majority in the House, we passed legislation each Congress to address California’s water crisis. Last year my House colleagues and I spent hundreds of hours negotiating with Democrats, only to have our Senators fail to show the leadership and courage our state needs to say “yes” to commonsense reforms. So whether or not the Sacramento Bee sees Senator Feinstein’s latest proposal as “thoughtful,” it does little to move us closer to a resolution.

We cannot mistake motion for action. My colleagues and I are ready to go to conference to find a solution — Californians have made it pretty clear they want action. Using the appropriations process is our best course of action.

Moreover, defenders of the status quo continue to push the inaccurate claim that our effort will “gut” the Endangered Species Act. In reality, our language calls for the Bureau of Reclamation (the Federal agency that operates the pumps) to pump at the maximum rate within the biological opinion parameters (-5,000 cfs at Old and Middle River). Here’s the language in our legislation:

“The Secretary of the Interior shall … manage export pumping rates to achieve a reverse OMR flow rate of -5,000 cubic feet per second unless existing information or that developed by the Secretary of the Interior under paragraphs (3) and (4) leads the Secretary to reasonably conclude, using the best scientific and commercial data available, that a less negative OMR flow rate is necessary to avoid a significant negative impact on the long-term survival of the species covered by the smelt biological opinion or salmonid biological opinion.”

Another provision of our proposal allows Reclamation to pump at higher rates to capture El Nino-related storm water provided there are no adverse impacts to protected fish, again using the best science.

This language includes something that I would think all Californians would champion: the best scientific and commercial data available. Instead, the defenders of the status quo point to doomsday scenarios of ecosystem destruction.

mccarthy_2016 export constraints

Just a month ago the Delta outflow was over 100,000 cubic feet per second while regulatory policies limited our ability to pump only -5,000 cubic feet per second. The irreversible damage done? Three adult Delta smelt have been killed and no larval/juvenile smelt have been killed this year. With all the protections for fish in our language, one must wonder if the editorial board simply chooses to hide behind the Endangered Species Act, rather than forcefully defend why it makes sense to continue to arbitrarily cut off water to their fellow Californians who live and work in the two-thirds of our state that is south of Sacramento.

Communities, like in East Porterville, continue to have NO water. It should be commonsense to put the well-being of families ahead of perceived threats to fish. More pumping is something that Senator Feinstein has acknowledged is needed. Instead of mistaking this legislation as a “potshot,” it should instead be highlighted that this is a hopeful development that the House and Senate can reach agreement on California water.

Make no mistake, my House colleagues and I remain unflinching in our resolve to fix this issue for our state, communities, and constituents. We will continue to use every legislative opportunity available to do so.

Originally published by foxandhoundsdaily.com

County payroll hikes stay ahead of population increases

Government is out of control—even in small counties. “Sierra County, tucked in the foothills once traversed by the Donner Party along the Nevada border, has seen its population dip 7 percent since 2010 to 3,000 souls.

Meantime, though, the county’s payroll increased from $7 million in 2013 to $8 million in 2014, while the county’s top wage earner, former Sheriff John Evans, saw his overall pay package increase 13 percent.” This is mainly because of mandates and regulations from Sacramento. The people of Sierra are frugal fiscally responsible folks. Sacrament is a spend and tax place—spend what you want, they raise taxes to pay for it.

In 2014 the GOP gave the people of California an Obama supporter as its candidate. The folks had no choice but NOT to voice—which is why at 42%, the November, 2014 turnout for at an historic low. Just as the 25% for the June primary was an historic low.

The time has come for the Republican Party to act like Republicans. Until then even the small counties will be harmed. The Democrat “moderates” vote like socialists and the Progressives vote like Bernie Sanders. Not much of a choice.

WhiteHouseMoney

County payroll hikes stay ahead of population increases

Steve Miller, CalWatchdog, 1/30/16

Sierra County, tucked in the foothills once traversed by the Donner Party along the Nevada border, has seen its population dip 7 percent since 2010 to 3,000 souls.

Meantime, though, the county’s payroll increased from $7 million in 2013 to $8 million in 2014, while the county’s top wage earner, former Sheriff John Evans, saw his overall pay package increase 13 percent.

Inyo County’s population dropped a modest seven-tenths of a percent, and managed to keep its payroll package total to a minor jump, from $35.3 million in 2013 to $36.6 million in 2014.

But the price of mental health apparently increased in Inyo; Jeanette Schneider, a county psychiatrist, received an 18 percent hike in her employment package in a year, from $164,000 to $195,000.

In isolated pockets around the state, government salaries, with their accompanying benefits, continue to go up.

Even in areas in which there seems little need due to declining population, politicians like Sierra County’s Evans, who worked first as a reserve officer and moved up the ranks, are rewarded with pay increases that rival those in the private sector.

The state still stings from the public salary debacle in Bell, where in 2010 it was revealed that city officials were taking outsized salaries. The discovery led to a 12-year prison sentence for former City Manager Robert Rizzo.

At publicpay.ca.gov, the public can see who is getting paid what at all levels of government

Today, anyone can check salaries in a number of cities, counties and schools via State Controller Betty Yee’s payroll database. Go to publicpay.ca.gov or transparentcalifornia.com, an endeavor hatched by the Nevada Policy Research Institute. The latter is used for this report.

Numerous smaller counties have refused to produce the requested information. Most of the refusals have come from smaller counties losing population, including Trinity, Alpine and Modoc counties.

The state’s population increased 4.2 percent between 2010 and 2014, according to Census Bureau data. Few municipalities lost people, making Sierra County an outlier.

In cities with modest growth, though, double-digit raises have been handed out freely.

San Benito County experienced growth of 4.5 percent between 2010 and 2014. Between 2011 and 2014, the county’s payroll increased 10 percent. The county’s highest paid employee is District Attorney Candice Hooper, whose compensation went from $190,870 in 2011 to $233,061 in 2014, a 22 percent raise.

Then there’s Kern County, which grew 5 percent while County Administrative Officer John Nilon received an $83,210 raise between 2011 and 2014.

The county pay increases have wide variances, and in some cases, both population and overall payroll has remained the same.

The population of Nevada County, for example, has remained the same for five years at around 98,000. Its payroll, at $68 million, has also stayed the same.

“We have wide differences in the state’s 58 counties, and the number of people and the pay scale will vary just as widely,” said Greg Fishman, a spokesman for the California State Association of Counties. He ventured that some of the larger increases in pay are being made up after some years of zero raises, or “catching up.”

The pay of county administrators like Nilon has always been high, and some might say outsized when considering the number of people in a county.

In a number of counties, the boards of supervisors have set higher pay rates for both administrators and elected positions such as sheriff or tax assessor.

Sometimes, pay cuts don’t take.

In El Dorado County, the Board of Supervisors in 2013 vowed to cut the pay of some top positions in the government, including the auditor-controller and the treasurer-tax collector.

The culprit was pay package add-ons, the board said.

“They just started getting more and more and more,” Board of Supervisors Chairman Ron Briggs told a reporter. The changes were to go into effect last year. Current total payroll is not yet available, but the episode typifies how compensation can get out of control, especially when collective bargaining contracts are in play.

Epitomizing the “more and more” concept are three physicians in Kern County, all of whom earn over $1 million in total compensation.

But despite calls for reform of the financially-troubled Kern Medical Center, where the three are employed, there has been little reform of the generous publicly-funded pay practices.

In December 2013, county leaders said the salaries at the medical center needed attention.

“We need to have a payroll review over there,” Kern County Supervisor Mick Gleason told a local newspaper. “Cost control has to be paramount in everything we do over there.”

His colleague, Supervisor Leticia Perez, added that “we are making dramatic and significant changes at KMC — to better the organization. It’s good to revisit these contracts.”

In 2014, one of the three physicians, Andrea Snow, saw no boost to her regular salary of $498,429 or the cost of her benefits. Instead, her “other pay,” which can include allowances and bonuses, was boosted by $300,000, a 29 percent compensation increase.