A New Way To Look At Poverty In California–Without Doing anything About It

This more be one of the silliest stories ever.  Does it really matter if the suburbs have more poverty than the rural areas?  Does it really matter if you spend billions in the cities to end homelessness—you see the more spent, the worse the situation?  Stop digging the hole. Stop spending time with definitions—work on the cause of the problem—government.

“Which California counties have the highest poverty rates? Well, that depends on how you measure.

A new analysis from the Public Policy Institute of California and the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality takes into account cost of living and any resources available from social safety net programs — unlike the official U.S. Census poverty measurement.

And under this measurement, the worst poverty rates aren’t in rural or Central Valley counties like Imperial, Fresno or Tulare. They’re on the coast, in counties like Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Orange.

High taxes are forcing the middle class to fle—and the rich to move away to protect their assets.  Stop those policies.  Stop making it costly to build homes—end the shortage, create jobs and bring down the price of homes with competition., not limiting homes available.  Government is the cause of poverty—not demographics.

A New Way To Look At Poverty In California

Ben Adler, Capitol Public Radio,  8/2/19 

Which California counties have the highest poverty rates? Well, that depends on how you measure.

A new analysis from the Public Policy Institute of California and the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality takes into account cost of living and any resources available from social safety net programs — unlike the official U.S. Census poverty measurement.

And under this measurement, the worst poverty rates aren’t in rural or Central Valley counties like Imperial, Fresno or Tulare. They’re on the coast, in counties like Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Orange.

Take, for example, the county with the lowest official poverty rate: San Mateo, at just over 6 percent. This alternative measurement suggests a more realistic estimate of San Mateo’s poverty rate would be more than 16 percent — 10 points higher. The trend is similar in other Bay Area counties like Marin and San Francisco.

On the other hand, the county with the worst official poverty rate, Tulare’s 25 percent, falls back down to 19 percent under this calculation — still high, but not the worst.

The county with the highest poverty rate under the alternative measurement is Los Angeles, at 23 percent. El Dorado has the lowest adjusted rate of just under 11 percent.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.