Charter schools boomed during the pandemic

We know that in just the past year 160,000 kids have moved from government schools to homeschooling.  Now we have reports showing others are leaving government schools for charter schools.  Neither report show the number of kids that have left the State, fleeing our oppressors, bigoted, hate filled government schools.

By the numbers: Charter school enrollment increased by 7.1% in the U.S. between the 2019-20 school year and the 2020-21 school year, per the analysis. That’s a jump of about 240,000 students.

  • During the same period, non-charter public school enrollment dropped 3.3%, which is a whopping 1.5 million students.”

Between homeschooling and charter schools, government schools have a problem.  We can help education in 2022 by passing an Educational Choice ballot measure—give kids a chance for a quality education.

Charter schools boomed during the pandemic

 

Erica Pandey, Axios,  9/21/21   

Charter schools picked off hundreds of thousands of public school students across the U.S. during the pandemic, according to a new analysis from the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

Why it matters: The pandemic has weakened America’s public education system, as Zoom classes, teacher fatigue and student disengagement take their toll. And that hobbled system is shedding students to charter schools, private schools and homeschooling.

  • Those dynamics are exacerbating inequities in American education, as it’s typically wealthier and white students who make the switch.

By the numbers: Charter school enrollment increased by 7.1% in the U.S. between the 2019-20 school year and the 2020-21 school year, per the analysis. That’s a jump of about 240,000 students.

  • During the same period, non-charter public school enrollment dropped 3.3%, which is a whopping 1.5 million students.

In certain states, charter schools have picked up an even greater share of students:

  • Charter enrollment is up 65% in Alabama and 78% in Oklahoma.
  • Bigger states that have seen a significant jump include Texas (9%), New York (7%) and Ohio (11%).

What to watch: School funding follows students, says Jon Hale, a professor of education at the University of Illinois. So he says to expect public schools to lose resources and teachers as students continue to flock to other types of schools.

  • Public schools that waffle over mask policies or delay the return to in-person learning will frustrate even more parents, who’ll pull their kids out and choose independent schools or homeschooling.
  • That’s a serious problem for the millions of American students who continue to rely on the public education system.
About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. Kenneth Hanson says

    This article is quite flawed in ways that detract from the point he was trying to make.

    Charter schools (in California) are still government schools, but with provisions that give the administrators more freedom in running the school.

    The statement about inequalities in education because more wealthy and white people can use home schooling, private schools, and charter schools is not meaningful because those schools represent opportunities for minorities to get better educations, if they can overcome the inconveniences of attending them. There are no credible claims of systemic efforts to exclude minorities from these better school opportunities.

    To reduce the “inequalities” due to expense or inconvenience of attending these better schools, a voucher system should be implemented where CA State school funding truly follows the students to the school they attend, whether it be home school, charter, or private.

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