Downturn for Black Americans has followed ‘Shelby’ ruling, study finds–NOT True

The November 2020 election in Georgia was filled with massive corruption.  Luggage with ballots “found” in election county office in the middle of the night, phony registrations, ballot harvesting with no evidence the person named actually voted and more.  So, the GOP passed voter integrity laws to protect the right to vote.  Democrats claimed this would cause voter suppression.  Instead, in the early voting for the 2022 primary, Georgia has record turn out.  Imagine, honest elections, per Democrats, would suppress the vote.  In fact, current dishonest voting rolls and government corruption protecting illegal voting, has caused voter suppression.

“The Rady School research “reveals the weakening of minority political power brought on by the 2013 Supreme Court decision made the government less responsive to minorities’ policy demands,” said Carlos Fernando Avenancio- Leon, assistant professor of finance at Rady.

“The VRA reduced economic inequality between Blacks and whites in two ways,” he added. “First, it contributed to the expansion of public employment opportunities. And, second it contributed to and complemented the enforcement of labor market policies such as affirmative action and anti- discrimination laws.”

What are they talking about—in America today, except is extremely rare individual cases—there is no laws preventing anybody, who is qualified, from voting.

Downturn for Black Americans has followed ‘Shelby’ ruling, study finds

Photo courtesy of 401(K) 2013, Flickr

By City News Service, 5/17/22   

Research from two UC San Diego Rady School of Management studies released Tuesday says that while the 1965 Voting Rights Act contributed to economic improvements for Black Americans, a 2013 Supreme Court ruling striking down a key provision in the act has led to economic disenfranchisement for that same group.

The first study — a working paper — found that counties where voting rights were more strongly protected experienced larger reductions in the Black-white wage gap between 1950 and 1980.

The second paper, published recently in the journal American Economic Association Papers and Proceedings, presented evidence that counties previously covered by the act started seeing a decrease in public sector wages for Black workers relative to wages for white workers, especially for new hires, as early as five years after the 2013 Supreme Court decision in Shelby County (Alabama) v. Holder.

In the Shelby case, the high court struck down as unconstitutional Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, which had mandated that certain states and localities with histories of racial discrimination obtain federal “preclearance” for any voting changes they implemented — as well as demonstrate that any proposed changes not have a discriminatory purpose or outcome.

The court found that Congress exceeded its authority in 2006 when it reauthorized Section 5 for another 25 years.

The Rady School research “reveals the weakening of minority political power brought on by the 2013 Supreme Court decision made the government less responsive to minorities’ policy demands,” said Carlos Fernando Avenancio- Leon, assistant professor of finance at Rady.

“The VRA reduced economic inequality between Blacks and whites in two ways,” he added. “First, it contributed to the expansion of public employment opportunities. And, second it contributed to and complemented the enforcement of labor market policies such as affirmative action and anti- discrimination laws.”

Both papers by Avenancio-Leon and his co-author, Abhay Aneja of UC Berkeley, focus on Section 5 of the VRA, which applied to practices or procedures in counties with histories of racial discrimination, primarily in the South and Southwest.

Chief Justice John Roberts cited the reasoning in the court’s opinion that “things have changed dramatically” in the South. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan dissented in the 5-4 ruling.

Avenancio-Leon said the research revealed the act was able to empower Black families economically — decreasing the wage gap by a statistically significant 5.5% — because it changed the political preferences of politicians.

Their analysis of the wage gap after the key section of the act was rendered ineffective compares trends in the Black/white wage gap in pairs of counties that share a border, where one county was previously covered by the now-null provision and the other was not.

The authors also found that voter turnout increased from 1968 to 1980 by 6.5 to 11.5% per election, with a jurisdiction’s turnout increasing by 2% for every 10% increase in its population share that was Black.

As of Jan. 14, legislators in at least 27 states have introduced, pre- filed or carried over 250 bills with restrictive voting provisions, compared to 75 such bills in 24 states on Jan. 14, 2021, according to research.

These enacted and proposed laws include vote-by-mail restrictions, restrictions on early voting and broader authority for purges of voter rolls.

“We hope that the evidence in our research is informative for lawmakers,” said the report authors. “In an era of increasing income inequality, it is worth considering the role of minority political disempowerment.”

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. Jim Coles says

    These studies contravene reality, especially here in Alabama.
    In our “Black Belt,” so named because of the deep & rich black soil that makes those 13 counties our bread basket; and the minority-majority populations therein.
    While many of the industrial companies migrating into Bama from oppressive Blue States are settling into those counties, public employment in the non-farm sector is still the largest job source.
    All public employment by state, county or municipal sources are bound by the same laws & pay scales that affect urban public employment.
    Wages & benefits have incrementally improved for public employees since the 2010 “Conservative Revolution” ended the 136 consecutive years rein of error by Democrats in Alabama.
    What we are seeing in Alabama & throughout the American Southeast is our brother & sister Americans of color are increasingly turning away from the historical manipulating & tormenting Democrat Party and toward Conservative leaders, both Black and White.
    The number of minority people joining the AL GOP & voting Republican increases every election cycle.
    It’s not correct or fair to say that affluence is pervasive in Alabama but it is factually true that poverty is on the decline here as more & more Black & Brown Alabamians reject state paternalism and seize control over their lives.
    We want EVERY legal citizen-resident of Alabama to thrive…and as onerous Federal rules are whittled away we are building a better, more equitable, more prosperous Alabama for everyone.

  2. Really??? says

    Statistics and dang statistics.

    Change the base line start point and you get what you want. Ignore the truth

    Just had an interesting interaction with a radical leftest Supervisor in Santa Barbara County with a Ph.D.

    Sent her an article that clearly calls into question the statistical basis of the Global Warming Crowd. When I made the point that her office dumped the email without opening it, because it was from me. The steel glare was clear.

    This article proves once again the Left doesn’t seem to care about the truth.

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