Frank: Coronavirus Could Cause NEW Education Dynamic

Government education will not look the same when schools open in the Fall.  The Internet will be bigger in the education process.  Teachers that use the classroom for indoctrination will be held to account—no more hate and bigotry, denouncements of the President in math classes—or other classes by the “adults” in the room.  Watch as parents demand homeschooling, charter schools and the end of union control of our children’s education.  Wishful thinking?  Maybe not.

“As you know, many of the school bonds on the March 3 ballot failed.  The biggest was Prop. 13, the $26 billion (principal plus interest) measure to help developers and to expand brick and mortar.  Now with the advent of 5G Internet speed and technology, we no longer need to expand buildings—we need to get more broadband instead.  This is cheaper and stops unneeded car trips, buses and trains.  Moreover, money saved on those would easily finance the expansion of broadband technology and 5G.

In fact the State of California, under Gov. Brown, created an online community college—cost affective, save commute time and with the same quality of education as in a physical classroom.  Why not expand the courses available online, when the virus threat is over?

Even before the virus crisis, Californians voted against the government schools.  By their vote they told the unions they do not trust the educrats to teach or spend money.   Will this revolution continue in the Fall?  We have to make it so.

Coronavirus Could Cause NEW Education Dynamic by Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank, California Political News and Views,  4/7/20 

Usually trends and cultural changes take years and decades to catch the golden ring.  In 1969 the Army was first on the Internet, but it took more than twenty years for the commercial, public use of the new medium to take hold.  Fifty years later, there is no way for us to live without the Internet. 

In July, 1995 Amazon was on the Internet—selling books.  Twenty five years later you can buy books, toilet paper and cars, around the world from Amazon.  It is killing brick and mortar retail shops, large and small.

In 1985 Blockbuster opened its first store, in Dallas, Texas.  The rental of videos created many other firms, made lots of money for early investors.  On a Saturday afternoon you could find your neighbors at Blockbuster, choosing movies to see for the weekend—for you, your spouse and your kids.  By 2005 the business was dying and cable TV, and DVR’s replaced the rental of movies.  This trend lasted about twenty years.  It came, it conquered, and it disappeared.

Fox News was launched in 1996 and changed the news business forever. But CNN was on the air in 1980 and started the trend of cable news.  Fox was started and the competition created a whole new information industry.

All of these aforementioned companies created new industries and a new way to look at the marketing of a product.  We will not be going back to the days before Amazon or Fox/CNN.  We will improve on them, but end them?  Not for decades until a new technique can be used.

The Coronavirus was not planned.  It may have exploded due to the authoritarian Chinese government refusing to admit they had a rare disease in their midst.  By not containing it in December, when it was isolated by Chinese doctors, the Government of China, allowed the creation of a world wide pandemic.  This is bad for everyone personally and economically.

We have seen the NBA and the NCAA close shop.  California is demanding no gathering of more than 250 people in one place—and for those who attend church or other public events with fewer people, everyone needs to sit six feet apart. Corporations are asking workers to work from home.  Zoom, a firm that makes video conferencing software—very good software—is exploding with demand.

A month ago  at 9:15 am  I left Simi Valley for Torrance.  At that time of day, it usually takes 90 minutes to two hours to Torrance on the 405 Freeway.  Instead it took me 68 minutes.  There was no traffic.  One reason is that UCLA has basically closed own, plus many tech firms on the West Side had workers stay home.

A few years ago Steve Poizner developed an online graduate degree for UCLA.  Instead of students spending time on the streets, freeways and in classrooms, they could take the classes, at a graduate level from the San Fernando Valley, San Jose or San Juan Puerto Rico.  The same quality education—but saved the environment.  Because of the coronavirus, most State colleges and Universities are finishing the semester using online classes instead of forcing students to physically attend classes.  The environmentalists should be promoting this type of education.

As you know, many of the school bonds on the March 3 ballot failed.  The biggest was Prop. 13, the $26 billion (principal plus interest) measure to help developers and to expand brick and mortar.  Now with the advent of 5G Internet speed and technology, we no longer need to expand buildings—we need to get more broadband instead.  This is cheaper and stops unneeded car trips, buses and trains.  Moreover, money saved on those would easily finance the expansion of broadband technology and 5G.

In fact the State of California, under Gov. Brown, created an online community college—cost affective, save commute time and with the same quality of education as in a physical classroom.  Why not expand the courses available online, when the virus threat is over?

Then you have government schools for grades k-12.  Did you know there is a national online charter school system, so students do not have to travel to class and they can learn at their own speed and in the time that fits their schedule?  We could save billions on brick and mortar.  In fact, that property could instead be used for the homeless and affordable housing.

While the Internet has been with us since 1969, we have not really taken advantage of it.  Yes, you can buy from Amazon or QVC on it, read the El Segundo Times (formerly L.A. Times) on it, and keep up with the stock market and the scores of your sport teams.   But we need to think outside the box.  Could it be that the coronavirus recreated the need for online education?  Is it possible that folks will see this as an advantage?

We save money, we save the environment, folks will no longer have to fight boys in girls bathrooms, the bullying, the harassment, the lack of free speech.  We can return education to its real purpose—education.

I do a lot of writing and research.  I can get more information at 3:00am on a Saturday morning from the Internet, including the Library of Congress, 3,000 miles away, then I can at 10:00am on Monday morning at the Simi Valley Public Library. 

The answer to money problems for schools, environmental problems for society, help for the homeless and an education that means something, is right in front of us.  Due to the coronavirus we can now think outside the box.  In fact, we should throw away the box.  This is 2020 and we should create education systems based on the world of today, not 1950.

Let something good come out of the coronavirus pandemic.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. Really??? says

    Self starters are the students that will be able to survive in the electronic class room. It is the problematic students that benefit from in class instruction and the hands on needed for success.

    It will be interesting to see who in the teaching ranks will survive? The teachers that really don’t like teaching and would prefer to “mail it in” will love this. Then there is the issue everyone seems to ignore. How do you stop the cheaters that have open books or friends answering the questions during tests?

    This is a long term slide into mediocrity. Over the years I have been friends with overseas instructors and companies. The consistently state that the quality of the American graduates out distances their students. It has to do with the ability to apply knowledge under changing circumstances.

    It will be interesting.

  2. Dr Trent Saxton says

    That “on line” Community College Brown created… can not account for all the millions of dollars it has spent since going on line. So far, expected enrollment for the on-line college is down by two-thirds. While it was a good idea during hard times…we were in good times when it was created. Students weren’t interested in being in school on or off line; they wanted to work.
    There were so many jobs available that employers were looking for anyone to work and paying good wages. As a Trustee for a Junior College, I strongly recommend that we train students in math and English, but most of all train students in the trades.
    Trades are needed to rebuild this country and it’s infrastructure. Award certificates in welding, plumbing, electrical, carpentry, and solar. You don’t need a four year degree or a two year degree to feel fulfilled in life. If you do…then go on for the degrees.
    Your first two years of college are free in California, you can live at home as most Junior college students do already. Learn a trade to pay for your next two years in college; if you decide to go further.

  3. Tracker 1 says

    Did anyone ask the students or parents what they want?????? What about the stores and community in general???? NO LOGIC HERE!!!!!

Speak Your Mind

*