Grove: Real reforms needed to deal with affordable housing

Senator Shannon Grove is correct.  The $2.7 billion the State Auditor showed as wasted in the pursuit of “affordable” housing is just the tip of the iceberg.  Affordable housing efforts are really in support of unions and special interest developers, using tax dollars to make a profit.

“California’s housing costs have been rising for decades, making buying a home a dream very few families can afford. The California State Auditor’s scathing report about the $2.7 billion in wasted affordable housing funds demonstrates yet again that the Democrats’ attempts to spend our way out of the housing crisis will not work.

The report pointed out that California has no comprehensive approach to building affordable housing, and its mismanagement has resulted in the loss of $2.7 billion – which could have gone a long way toward fixing the homelessness crisis.”

It is time to re-evaluate the cause of homelessness and need for affordable housing.  Government needs to end its efforts that cause these problems.  That would be a great start.  Then it needs to get the greed and politics out of the equation.  Help real people not the rich and the politically powerful unions.

Real reforms needed to deal with affordable housing

In summary

The state auditor’s report points out that California has no comprehensive approach to building affordable housing and it wasted $2.7 billion.

By Shannon Grove, Special to CalMatters, 11/22/20  

State Sen. Shannon Grove of Bakersfield represents California’s 16th Senate District and is the Senate Republican Leader, [email protected]

California’s housing costs have been rising for decades, making buying a home a dream very few families can afford. The California State Auditor’s scathing report about the $2.7 billion in wasted affordable housing funds demonstrates yet again that the Democrats’ attempts to spend our way out of the housing crisis will not work.

The report pointed out that California has no comprehensive approach to building affordable housing, and its mismanagement has resulted in the loss of $2.7 billion – which could have gone a long way toward fixing the homelessness crisis.

California Democrats continue to throw money at problems but won’t deal with the root causes that lead to the policy issues, like mandates that drive up housing costs and abuses of environmental laws, like CEQA, that block developments until builders agree to higher union wages. You can also add various local government problems to that list.

This latest report by the California State Auditor is further proof that the state cannot just spend its way out of the housing crisis. There’s simply not enough money to do it in the first place, and significant amounts of money get wasted by mismanagement in the second. 

To this day, Gov. Gavin Newson has not implemented any outcome measures that would help the state identify how well it has maximized the impact of the housing funds, let alone know how the state resources will contribute to meeting the statewide need.  

Over the years, Republican senators repeatedly have warned that California needs real reforms to the misguided, special-interest policies that make it incredibly expensive to build housing in California in the first place. But Democrats are only interested in these reforms when it’s time to build sports arenas for the wealthy and well-connected; never when it’s housing for regular folks.

The Democrats’ refusal to make necessary reforms leads to hard truths, like California having the highest poverty rate in the nation when the cost of living – which includes housing – is factored in.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. Think about this quote “… California has no comprehensive approach to building affordable housing…..”

    And why should government be involved in building affordable housing. What happened after WWII? GI’s flooded the nation in search of a “normal” life and families. That required housing.

    The private sector answered that call. Interest rates made “track” housing affordable, and mass production made it affordable.

    Does anyone reading this know a “manufactured” house is a minimum of 50% less expensive than a stick built house? That is another private sector answer.

    Government and the Marxist Democrats (and their fellow travelers) need to step aside and stop micro managing consumer goods, social behavior, transportation etc.

  2. The problem is the ceqa laws. Working your way through the rules and regulation not to mention the frivolous that are filed under the ceqa laws raise the price of house building by about 1000%. There was a housing project north of Los Angeles that has been fighting lawsuits for over 20 years and still can’t start building.

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