A new wave of far-left candidates out to oust old-guard Democrats

California Democrats are going to be the epicenter of revolution at the ballot box.  No, the GOP is not going to be a significant voice—it will be the AOC type Progressives changing the California Democrat Party from Socialist—to Soviet.

““We need a new generation of diverse, working-class Democrats to build a bloc that will vote together and help build the movement,” Justice Democrats’ website reads. “We recruited and helped AOC pull off one of the biggest upsets in American history, but the top of the Democratic Party is still disproportionately wealthier, whiter and more male than the base.”

It’s a battle for the soul of the Democratic Party and a test of whether voters are ready for a dramatically left-wing vision for America.

This could cause a GOP blowout, largest in American history as real Democrats believe in freedom and choice, not a totalitarian government.

A new wave of far-left candidates out to oust old-guard Democrats

By Mica Soellner – The Washington Times , 1/21/22   

A new generation of liberal Democrats is entering the political arena with a rush of AOC-inspired young left-wing candidates looking to oust the party’s old guard this year.

Justice Democrats, the political action committee that helped elect “The Squad” — the ultra-liberal group of six congressional House members led by New York’s Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — is mobilizing around a new slate of candidates running primary challenges this year against several incumbent Democrats.

The new faces are younger and more diverse, and back far-left policies, like the Green New Deal and universal health care, that have given pause to moderate members.

 “We need a new generation of diverse, working-class Democrats to build a bloc that will vote together and help build the movement,” Justice Democrats’ website reads. “We recruited and helped AOC pull off one of the biggest upsets in American history, but the top of the Democratic Party is still disproportionately wealthier, whiter and more male than the base.”

It’s a battle for the soul of the Democratic Party and a test of whether voters are ready for a dramatically left-wing vision for America.

This year, the battle is playing out against a bleak election cycle in which House Democrats are expected to struggle to hold onto the majority.

Justice Democrats is backing at least six candidates running for open seats or in primary challenges against longtime members of their party.

Odessa Kelly, a 39-year-old openly gay Black Nashville activist, was the first major primary challenger to announce her candidacy for the 2022 cycle.

Ms. Kelly is taking on longtime Rep. Jim Cooper, a Blue Dog Democrat, who has represented his middle Tennessee district since 2003.

“When I looked at the reflection of who I am, as a civil servant, as an organizer, as a Black woman, as a gay woman, as a mother, as a person who is desperately trying to get some of this pressure off of my life, I said, the only way that this happens is if I start seeing and hearing people in leadership who look like me and have the same set of perspectives as me, and that is not Jim Cooper,” Ms. Kelly told The Discourse Blog.

Other members who must fend off challenges include New York Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Illinois Rep. Danny Davis and Texas Rep. Henry Cuellar, who is considered among the most conservative Democrats in the caucus.

The new crop of far-left candidates has their work cut out for them. At the ballot box so far, the pace of the far-left takeover of the party is still more evolution than revolution.

Liberal members are becoming increasingly influential in the Democratic Party, but their ability to win elections is still weaker than more moderate members, said Costas Panagopoulos, a political science professor at Northeastern University.

“If you look at how progressive candidates fared in the 2018 and 2020 cycles, some did better than others, and the overall record is mixed,” Mr. Panagopoulos said. “It’s not the case that progressives have taken over the Democratic Party or are winning handily over more moderate candidates in the party, even if their influence remains strong.”

In 2018, Justice Democrats endorsed 65 non-incumbent candidates for the House, mostly for open seats. Of those, 24 candidates made it to the general election. Only seven won seats, according to data compiled by the left-leaning Brookings Institute.

In 2020, Justice Democrats endorsed eight candidates, including three primary challengers against moderate incumbents. Only Ms. Newman won her race, ousting former Illinois Rep. Dan Lipinski, a conservative Democrat who often broke with his party on abortion rights.

Jonathan Krasno, a political science professor at Binghamton University, said Mr. Lipinski’s loss last year was a result of changing party values that no longer fit the mold of the lawmaker’s stances on certain social issues.

“Dan Lipinski is a good example of somebody who was in a difficult situation because he was out of step with the party and out of step with his district,” Mr. Krasno said. “I don’t know that I think that moderates are out of business in the party, like nobody’s trying to purge anybody, but this is the way competition plays out. You take positions that people don’t like, and they have the right to run against you.”

Rep. Mark Takano, California Democrat and member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said he welcomes more liberal members to run for office and hopefully get elected, adding that he sees progressive values as the path forward for the Democratic Party.

“I’d like to see more progressive members, but what drives the progressiveness is really the public will,” Mr. Takano told The Washington Times. “We’re seeing that at the grassroots level across the country on issues. I think the American public in many ways is aligned with a more progressive Congress.”

Rep. Sanford Bishop, Georgia Democrat, disagrees.

Mr. Bishop, a member of the centrist Blue Dog Coalition, said much of the electorate is still middle-of-the-road, even if the left-wing members of his party have a more amplified voice.

“Our party, as well as the country, is more centrist,” Mr. Bishop said. “Progressives seem to get a lot more press because I guess it’s more exotic and exciting. It sells more newspapers. But by and large, the country is center-based, either center-left or center-right. We’ve got some people who are far-right, some people who are far-left, but most of America is in the center.”

California proposal would let children age 12 and older get vaccines without parents’ consent

Democrat Scott Weiner is clear—that if parents act like parents, then he will use government to control the children.

“Alabama allows such decisions at age 14, Oregon at 15, Rhode Island and South Carolina at 16, according to Sen. Scott Wiener, a Democrat from San Francisco who is proposing the change. Only Washington, D.C., has a lower limit, at age 11.

He argued that California already allows those 12 and up to consent to the Hepatitis B and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, and to treatment for sexually transmitted infections, substance abuse and mental health disorders.”

Of course when the kids gt sick the parents will need to get the kids to the hospital and pay for the government dan

California proposal would let children age 12 and older get vaccines without parents’ consent

ABC News,  1.21.22  

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California would allow children age 12 and up to be vaccinated without their parents’ consent, the youngest age of any state, under a proposal late Thursday by a state senator.

Alabama allows such decisions at age 14, Oregon at 15, Rhode Island and South Carolina at 16, according to Sen. Scott Wiener, a Democrat from San Francisco who is proposing the change. Only Washington, D.C., has a lower limit, at age 11.

He argued that California already allows those 12 and up to consent to the Hepatitis B and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, and to treatment for sexually transmitted infections, substance abuse and mental health disorders.

“Giving young people the autonomy to receive life-saving vaccines, regardless of their parents’ beliefs or work schedules, is essential for their physical and mental health,” he said. “It’s unconscionable for teens to be blocked from the vaccine because a parent either refuses or cannot take their child to a vaccination site.”

Currently in California, minors ages 12 to 17 cannot be vaccinated without permission from their parents or guardian, unless the vaccine is specifically to prevent a sexually transmitted disease.

Wiener’s bill would lift the parental requirement for that age group for any vaccine that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That includes immunizations against the coronavirus, but Wiener said vaccine hesitancy and misinformation has also deterred vaccinations against measles and other contagious diseases that can then spread among youths whose parents won’t agree to have them vaccinated.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom in October announced the nation’s first coronavirus vaccine mandate for schoolchildren. But it likely won’t take effect until later this year and allows exemptions for medical reasons, religious and personal beliefs – though lawmakers may try to limit non-medical reasons.

Wiener’s legislation is permissive, not a mandate, but any vaccination legislation has been hugely controversial in California and elsewhere.


Even before the pandemic, busloads of opponents filled the Capital and lined up for hours to protest bills lifting religious and personal beliefs for the 10 vaccines already required of school children.

And in September, more than a thousand people rallied outside the state Capitol to oppose vaccine mandates, even though lawmakers had postponed their consideration of legislation requiring that workers either be vaccinated or get weekly coronavirus testing to keep their jobs.

“This to me seems to be another example of Democrats wanting to remove parents from the equation,” said Republican Assemblyman James Gallagher. “I think that’s flawed policy. I think parents are vital to these decisions.”

However, he thinks Wiener may have difficulty even in a Legislature overwhelmingly controlled by Democrats.

“I think there will be bipartisan support for the proposition that parents should be involved in their kids’ health care decisions, in deciding what types of medical care and drugs they should be taking,” Gallagher said.

On Wednesday, Wiener and other Democratic lawmakers announced that they have formed a “work group” to examine ways to promote vaccines and fight misinformation.


Members include Sen. Richard Pan, a pediatrician who authored previous vaccine legislation; Sen. Josh Newman; and Assembly members Dr. Akilah Weber, Buffy Wicks, Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, and Evan Low.

Wiener, joined by Pan, planned a news conference about his SB866 Friday alongside San Francisco’s public health director, Dr. Grant Colfax, and several school children.

Wiener held out the examples of children who may want to get vaccinated because they currently are barred from participating in sports, band or other activities because their parents either won’t or can’t get them vaccinated.

Children age 5 and up are currently eligible for coronavirus vaccines, but 28.6% of those in California ages 12-17 remain unvaccinated – more than 900,000 of an eligible population of more than 3 million, or more than one in four, Wiener said.

He said those 12 and up can also consent to abortions in California, though in that case lawmakers in 1987 passed a law that would have required minors to get their parents’ consent absent a medical emergency or a judge’s permission. But that law was overturned by the state Supreme Court.

Maskless attendees cause California school board meeting to abruptly end

It is finally happening.  The people of California are noo longer following irrational, silly rules that make no sense.  Wearing a diaper on your face makes you part of a comedy skit, not safe from a disease.

“For the second time in two weeks, the president of the Placentia-Yorba Linda School Board abruptly shut down a meeting minutes after it began because people in the audience were not wearing face masks.

School staff and most board members walked out. But Trustees Leandra Blades and Shawn Youngblood remained and held an unofficial “town hall” with some 70 residents in the auditorium.

For more than two hours, those residents spoke with Blades and Youngblood about the mask mandate, saying there’s little uniformity on how it’s enforced in local schools. Blades claimed the official meeting was called off as a way to prevent her from bringing up the issue. Youngblood questioned whether the district should have accepted millions in federal COVID money and he suggested it be returned.

Just because children were elected to run schools, does not mean adults should be quiet.  Watch as school boards get charged with child abuse,

Maskless attendees cause California school board meeting to abruptly end

A Placentia-Yorba Linda School Board meeting stopped less than five minutes after it began for the second time this month.

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By ROXANA KOPETMAN | Southern California News Group1/21/22  

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For the second time in two weeks, the president of the Placentia-Yorba Linda School Board abruptly shut down a meeting minutes after it began because people in the audience were not wearing face masks.

School staff and most board members walked out. But Trustees Leandra Blades and Shawn Youngblood remained and held an unofficial “town hall” with some 70 residents in the auditorium.

For more than two hours, those residents spoke with Blades and Youngblood about the mask mandate, saying there’s little uniformity on how it’s enforced in local schools. Blades claimed the official meeting was called off as a way to prevent her from bringing up the issue. Youngblood questioned whether the district should have accepted millions in federal COVID money and he suggested it be returned.

At one point, a woman in the post-meeting audience said, “There’s not a deadly virus anywhere in the ountry.” The crowd cheered and someone said, “Amen.”

In the United States, more than 858,000 people have died of COVID-19. In Orange County, 5,946 people have died of the virus. And in recent weeks, local schools have struggled to stay open as they battle skyrocketing absenteeism among students and teachers due to the surging omicron variant.

Wednesday night, the meeting kicked off with Board President Carrie Buck reading from a prepared statement that reminded the audience that the state Department of Public Health ordered masks indoors in public buildings through Feb. 15. She also specified that mesh masks do not meet that requirement, and offered free masks to anyone who wanted it. People who didn’t wish to wear a mask were told they could watch the meeting outside via a live stream.

Trustee Blades, pulling down a bandanna, attempted to speak. Buck stopped her: “You also need to have your mask on.”

“Well, I’m speaking now,” Blades said.

Responded Buck: “You have to wear it, no matter when you’re speaking.”

Blades said that Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to President Biden, has spoken without a mask.

Buck told her: “In this building, we have to wear a mask.”

Turning to the audience, Buck said many were not wearing face coverings correctly. She then adjourned the meeting — two minutes and 39 seconds after it began. A similar scenario played out on Jan. 19, when Buck closed the meeting after four minutes and 33 seconds, also because of mask rules.

“This is illegal. You can’t just do that,” one person screamed out, as recorded in a video by one attendee and shared on Facebook.

Youngblood and others questioned whether parliamentary procedures were violated. One resident yelled about violation of law and said he had already complained to the Orange County District Attorney’s Office. On Thursday, a spokeswoman for that department said they don’t comment on complaints submitted to the D.A.

Blades said she had a number of issues she planned to bring up at the meeting, including the idea of board members having a greater say in the hiring of principals. “Don’t you want to know what their values are? What their beliefs are?”

Blades, a retired police officer, became the target of a petition last year after it became known she was at the U.S. Capitol with friends on Jan. 6.  She denied any involvement in the violence that took place that day.

RELATED: School board meetings become verbal battle zones in COVID era

In recent years, the Placentia-Yorba Linda School Board has attracted large crowds at many of its meetings, with debates raging over pandemic-related issues, ethnic studies and the college-level study of racism known as critical race theory.

Who’s on what side is not hard to figure out. First, there’s the mask – a clear give-away of who is following safety protocols. Many residents also wear either green shirts, in support of ethnic studies and face masks, or red shirts, against mandatory vaccines, face masks and ethnic studies.

The tone of the meetings “can be pretty toxic, and a little scary, because they’re yelling,” said Samiya Hai, a Yorba Linda parent who has attended several meetings. “It’s not like you can go and be comfortable,” she said.

“There’s a guy who comes with underwear on his face.”

Another parent, Brian Sarno, said meetings tend to be dominated by what he called “a loud minority.” Parents who are more cautious of the virus are more likely to stay away, he noted.

At Wednesday night’s unofficial gathering with Blades and Youngblood, many of the people who stuck around wore red shirts. Few wore face coverings.

One woman wearing a red shirt emblazoned with “I’ll pull them” – meaning she will take her kids out of public school – complained to Youngblood and Blades that there’s little consistency about mask enforcement. Blades agreed. She pointed to a large poster of a group of students inside a high school gym showing that many did not have face masks on.

Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School Board trustee Leandra Blades, left, holds up a poster-sized photo after the scheduled board meeting was canceled in Placentia on Wednesday, January 19, 2022. Blades claims the photo shows un-masked students at a Yorba Linda High basketball game on the same day a student at the school was kicked out not wearing a mask. Trustee Shawn Youngblood, right, and Leandra Blades remained at the dais to have a ‘town hall’ with parents against the mask mandate after board president Carrie Buck canceled the meeting minutes after it started. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG) 

Another topic that emerged is whether the district could have avoided face mask mandates had it not accepted several million dollars in federal COVID relief funds. Youngblood suggested the board could consider returning the money.

Alyssa Griffiths, the district spokeswoman, wrote in an e-mail late Thursday that the Placentia-Yorba Linda district still would have to abide by any guidelines, including a mask mandate, set by the California Department of Public Health and the Orange County Health Care Agency.

Kindra Britt, spokeswoman for the California County Superintendents Educational Services Association, also said schools have to follow state face mask rules regardless of whether they accept federal relief dollars.

Another point that has been repeatedly brought up, and which led to a protest outside Travis Ranch School in Yorba Linda earlier this month, revolved around mesh masks.

Dr. Clayton Chau, who heads the Orange County Health Care Agency, said in an e-mail Thursday that there’s no specific guidance from the state regarding mesh masks. But fabric masks “that are not tightly woven or with inadequate layers provide little protection,” he wrote. The Centers for Disease Control and the state’s health department note that it’s important to wear masks that fit well; N95 masks offer the best protection.

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Tax hikes for universal health care in California? $280 Billion?

The single payer concept will bankrupt the people of California.  The proposed budget by Newsom is over $280 billion.  That you have to add another $281 billion for health care.  You and your family will be paying double in taxes and receiving Soviet style health care—which means the elites get care and you get the lines.

“But the funding source — taxes — proposed in a separate bill will likely face an uphill battle. Tax hikes must be approved by two-thirds of lawmakers in both the state Assembly and Senate — a tall order, especially in an election year — and a majority of voters to go into effect. And the doctors’ lobby, insurance industry and business groups are already mobilizing against the bill.

Who will vote to double their taxes—and make doctors agents of the State?  How many Democrats will lose their legislative seats because they want to be Putin?

Tax hikes for universal health care in California?

BY EMILY HOEVENJ, CalMatters,   1/7/22

IN SUMMARY

A group of Democratic legislators on Thursday unveiled a package of bills to create a universal health care program funded by new taxes.

To implement single-payer health care, or not to implement single-payer health care?

That’s the question facing state lawmakers after a group of Democratic legislators on Thursday unveiled a package of bills to create a universal health care program called CalCare. The proposal has already earned better reception than it did last year, when it was tabled without a hearing after lawmakers raised concerns about its lack of a funding source.

Democratic Assemblymember Jim Wood of Santa Rosa said Thursday that he will vote to move the bill forward next week when it’s scheduled to be considered by the Assembly Health Committee, which he leads.

  • Wood: “I continue to feel the frustration, desperation, and quite frankly, the anger that many Californians experience in their efforts to access quality and affordable health care. … Something’s got to give, so next Tuesday, I’ll be voting for change.”

Learn more about legislators mentioned in this story

But the funding source — taxes — proposed in a separate bill will likely face an uphill battle. Tax hikes must be approved by two-thirds of lawmakers in both the state Assembly and Senate — a tall order, especially in an election year — and a majority of voters to go into effect. And the doctors’ lobby, insurance industry and business groups are already mobilizing against the bill.

  • Rob Lapsley, president of the California Business Roundtable: This “middle-class tax increase will drive more families into poverty, force more small businesses to close and compel more employers — and jobs — to leave this state.”

Here’s a closer look at how state lawmakers are proposing to pay for universal health care, which state analysts in 2017 estimated could cost about $400 billion annually:

  • A 2.3% excise tax on businesses after their first $2 million in income.
  • A 1.25% payroll tax on employers with 50-plus workers.
  • An additional 1% payroll tax on wages for resident employees earning more than $49,900.
  • A progressive income tax starting at 0.5% for Californians earning more than $149,500, up to 2.5% for people making about $2.5 million annually. (Those rates would also be adjusted for inflation.)

The bills present a conundrum for Gov. Gavin Newsom, who vowed to implement single-payer health care when campaigning for the governorship in 2018. That earned him the backing of powerful groups like the California Nurses Association and progressive activists — and now they want him to make good on his promise, especially after they mobilized to help him defeat the recall last September. An estimated 3.2 million Californians remain uninsured.

A Better California Doesn’t Require A Big-Government Budget

The budget presented by Guv Newsom for the next year is $286 billion.  Then you have to add $281 billion for the cost of Soviet style health care!  You have bankrupted the States, doctors and nurses will not want to be government employees—they will flee to Free States.  Newsom just said we are a Third World State—Soviet style health care means we will not live through the disaster.

“But the blue state agenda bled through. In his enumeration of “existential threats” to California – such as COVID-19, homelessness, the high cost of living, and crime – he listed the “climate crisis.” After spending “an unprecedented $15.1 billion” committed in the last budget “to address the existential issues of climate change,” he wants another $22.5 billion in 2022-23, “taking it to a whole new level.” Part of the money would be handed out to a “first-in-the-nation climate corps” and “investments,” which are not capital intended to deliver financial returns but politically targeted expenditures of taxpayers’ dollars, such as $10 billion over two years to promote electric vehicles.

He is also counting on lawmakers agreeing with his insistence that “California will write the playbook for how America confronts the impacts of climate change” and forge an “oil-free future.”

He wants to finance his donors and friends believing junk science as the excuse to scam $100 bllion from the people of California. Has a government in history been this corrupt?

A Better California Doesn’t Require A Big-Government Budget

Kerry Jackson, Issues and Insights,  1/21/22  

For most, “budget” means a set amount of money they’re able to spend over a defined period of time, such as the funds available in a household account. To California lawmakers, “budget” holds a different meaning. In their world, it typically defines an opportunity to freely spend a massive harvest of other people’s earnings on programs that support the politically connected and further a policy agenda that has caused a growing flight from the state.

For the fiscal year 2022-23 beginning July 1, Gov. Gavin Newsom and the Legislature have roughly $263 billion to spend. Within that bounty is a $31 billion surplus, which a former aide to Govs. Gray Davis and Arnold Schwarzenegger says “is every politician’s dream.” It might even be a moment that exceeds the imagination, as Newsom has “no credible opposition to reelection and the wind at his back,” so “should be able to tackle any major issue he sets his mind to.”

Newsom’s free-form presentation of his budget blueprint, though three hours long, wasn’t entirely a Hollywood trailer for a coming spend-a-thon. His plan includes “a $523 million dollar gas tax holiday of sorts” through “avoiding that inflation adjustment that comes in July,” and the possibility of “​​substantial contributions back to the taxpayers.” Newsom also indicated he wants to be tougher on criminals as well as district attorneys who won’t prosecute.

As anyone should have expected, the governor wants to dedicate more dollars to pandemic-related programs and wildfire suppression, items that few would oppose no matter their political orientation, even though the virus response might be late.

But the blue state agenda bled through. In his enumeration of “existential threats” to California – such as COVID-19, homelessness, the high cost of living, and crime – he listed the “climate crisis.” After spending “an unprecedented $15.1 billion” committed in the last budget “to address the existential issues of climate change,” he wants another $22.5 billion in 2022-23, “taking it to a whole new level.” Part of the money would be handed out to a “first-in-the-nation climate corps” and “investments,” which are not capital intended to deliver financial returns but politically targeted expenditures of taxpayers’ dollars, such as $10 billion over two years to promote electric vehicles.

He is also counting on lawmakers agreeing with his insistence that “California will write the playbook for how America confronts the impacts of climate change” and forge an “oil-free future.”

Would that we could say all the attention to climate is a noble gesture. But it’s merely more costly virtue signaling. California generates only about 1% of global greenhouse gases. It can neither single-handedly, nor through some sort of appeal that inspires other states to follow its path, impact the climate.   

Among Newsom’s sub-categories of existential threats is health care coverage, which falls under the high-cost-of-living category. The governor believes ​​expanding coverage of Medi-Cal, the state’s health care program for the poor, to low-income illegal immigrants will ease the burden. It’s his goal to “make California the first state in the nation to offer universal access to health care coverage for all state residents, regardless of immigration status.” Cost: $2.7 billion a year, which has to be paid for through taxes, which happen to be a significant contributor to the state’s high cost of living.

Moving independently of Newsom’s plan is a single-payer proposal concocted by the Legislature. The two-pronged approach includes a constitutional amendment to generate revenue (through $163 billion in higher taxes) and legislation that defines its mission. When asked, Newsom appeared cool to AB 1400 and ACA 11, but he reiterated his dedication to the principle of single-payer health care.

Shrinking California’s high cost of living shouldn’t require greater government interference in medical care, nor should $2 billion in tax credits and grants for additional home building, and grants to boost small businesses. But let’s not argue over cutting red tape and waiving government fees, as Newsom proposes. Those are necessary responses that should be included in any public policy initiative.

The Los Angeles Times reports that “Newsom’s allies say his good fortune provides him a rare opportunity to focus on creating a better California.” But politicians and their largess aren’t the sources of good times. Those come when lawmakers limit their meddling and spending.

Mayor Breed Corruption in San Fran: She is Shredding Documents

You can easily tell when a political hack is about to be caught—they start shredding the evidence.  That is what San Fran Mayor Breed is doing.  Several around her have plead guilty or already in jail—only a matter of time when she joins them

“The mayor’s office’s documents retention policy, signed by Mayor Ed Lee, is from 2014. It states that for most emails, “it is up to the originator or recipient to determine when document’s business utility has ended.” The mayor’s policy also says “records and other documents or materials that are not expressly addressed by the attached schedule may be destroyed at any time.”

Snyder said that policy “invites an interpretation that anything and everything can be destroyed right away.” That’s the opposite of what a records retention policy is meant to do, he said. “The policy should say records must be preserved, except under these exceptions.”

Experts say The City’s policy is a catch-22: The public has a right to request information from The City, but The City has a right to destroy it first.

Literally, in San Fran they can legally destroy the evidence.

Is City Hall’s ‘document deleting’ cause for alarm?

Mayor’s office and other departments are destroying correspondence at a rate that shocks First Amendment experts

By Jeff Elder SF Examiner, 1/20/22   

The public is sometimes unable to obtain documents from City Hall related to issues including COVID-19, crime and other key issues (Craig Lee/The Examiner)

San Francisco City Hall, in an apparently legal but troubling practice, is deleting public officials’ correspondence at a rate that stuns First Amendment experts. As a result, the public is sometimes unable to obtain documents related to issues including COVID-19, crime and other key issues, an Examiner investigation has found.

“The City should be erring on the side of preservation, not allowing for maximal destruction,” said David Snyder, executive director of the nonprofit First Amendment Coalition in San Rafael. “The willy-nilly destruction of emails and texts, if that’s what’s going on, is a huge problem.”

The City Attorney’s guidance on document preservation allows city employees to delete most e-mails and texts, but it prohibits the destruction of correspondence sought in public records requests, and requires The City to search for deleted emails on computers.

But records show some correspondence is almost immediately wiped out.

In one response to a public information request, Mayor London Breed’s office said it did not have texts between the mayor’s office and the chief of police’s office in response to a public records request filed three hours after the texts were sent.

Snyder said that kind of record destruction is inappropriate. “There’s no legal scenario I can imagine where destruction within three hours would be appropriate,” he said.

A spokesperson for the mayor’s office said the office “conducts a good faith, reasonable search effort to locate any responsive documents, including searching files and servers where such documents are likely to exist and consulting with individuals that might possess such documents.”

The spokesperson said the mayor has responded to hundreds of requests every year, providing thousands of records in accordance with department policy and city law.

In another case, The Examiner requested a copy of an email about early COVID-19 policy from the mayor’s office. After an exchange of 10 emails over two months, the mayor’s office responded, “We no longer have copies of such records in the Office of the Mayor.”

“That’s a real red flag. You were having a conversation about a document, and then they came back and said ‘We no longer have it’,” said Kevin Goldberg, a First Amendment specialist at the nonprofit Freedom Forum in Washington, D.C.

In another case, the mayor’s office said in June it had no records related to an early COVID-19 testing site being set up by The City. The email was an important document showing the early battle against the pandemic, potentially elevating it above the importance of most correspondence and into the realm of public interest.

Other city officials did consider it noteworthy enough to keep and necessary to disclose and provided the emails upon request. Withholding or deleting an email chain about an early COVID-19 testing site organized by the mayor is not in the service of the people of San Francisco, the First Amendment experts say.

“That’s exactly the opposite of what they’re supposed to do,” said Goldberg.

The mayor’s spokesperson, Andy Lynch, said the texts related to crime in Union Square and the email about the COVID-19 testing site “were maintained in accordance with the record retention policy and were not saved beyond the period they were needed for continuing operations.”

The spokesperson said “we no longer had a copy of the email” related to early COVID-19 policy, but provided the information it did have twice.

“The Office of the Mayor performs diligent searches for records in response to the many records requests it receives and retains records consistent with all applicable requirements. The Sunshine Ordinance Task Force has never found a violation by this administration for failure to preserve requested records,” the spokesperson said.

In another case, the Department of Public Health received a request for the texts of former Public Health Officer Tomás Aragón in June 2020. There were multiple emails about the request, but no records were produced. In February 2021, the DPH responded to the requester that it no longer had the texts because Aragón left his job at The City. The DPH did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the incident.

Part of the issue is an interpretation of San Francisco law giving city officials broad discretion over the destruction of documents, the experts say.

The City Attorney’s guidance on San Francisco law says “employees may immediately dispose of phone message slips, notes of meetings, research notes prepared for the personal use of the employee creating them, and the large majority of e-mail communications.”

“That leaves far too much discretion up to individual city employees,” said Snyder, of San Rafael’s First Amendment Coalition.

The City Attorney’s office said in a statement, “San Francisco’s ordinance governing records retention is consistent with state and federal law. Our office advises city departments to comply with those laws.”

Some experts disagree.

“It’s a lot broader than other cities’ records retention schedules that I’ve seen,” said Snyder.

Allowing employees to immediately delete emails on their own discretion “certainly skews toward more unusual policies,” said Goldberg of the Freedom Forum. “It’s unfortunate.”

And San Francisco attorney Karl Olson, who specializes in public records act litigation, went further: “Any policy which gives city employees and officials discretion to destroy documents, at least documents less than two years old, is inconsistent with the Public Records Act, state law and the constitutional right of access to public records.”

Some city departments are relying on documents destruction policies that are years old, one even predating email and texts.

The San Francisco Police Department’s policy on records retention is a typed document from 1993 that doesn’t mention emails or texts. The subject matter expert last working on the policy has retired, the department told The Examiner, but the department is working on an update.

Old document retention policies are problematic, Goldberg said. Technology changes, and there is less need to shed documents because there’s no longer a need to make room in file cabinets for paperwork. “You should be keeping records longer in the digital age,” he said, especially in a tech center like San Francisco.

The mayor’s office’s documents retention policy, signed by Mayor Ed Lee, is from 2014. It states that for most emails, “it is up to the originator or recipient to determine when document’s business utility has ended.” The mayor’s policy also says “records and other documents or materials that are not expressly addressed by the attached schedule may be destroyed at any time.”

Snyder said that policy “invites an interpretation that anything and everything can be destroyed right away.” That’s the opposite of what a records retention policy is meant to do, he said. “The policy should say records must be preserved, except under these exceptions.”

Experts say The City’s policy is a catch-22: The public has a right to request information from The City, but The City has a right to destroy it first.

“This situation flies in the face of everything we understand to be important about the retention of records at the state and city level,” Goldberg said.

Simi Valley Unified Abuses Child—REFUSES to Allow Nine Year old to get an education.

Like in the old Soviet Union unless you obey silly rules and allow yourself to be punished for asking questions, the Simi Valley Unified School District will violate State ;law and prevent children from getting an education.  I am surprised the father in this case has not filed felony child abuse charges—and the Superintendent has not been arrested for embezzlement—the stealing of an education based on junk science an “the State told me to do it.”  Same words used in Europe in World War II.

“The student’s father, Timothy Hernandez, wrote on his Instagram account—which was open for public view—about his son being kicked out of school Jan. 7 for noncompliance with the state’s mask mandate, which the district says it is required to follow.

Hernandez said that when his son tried to return to the campus to get his schoolwork on Jan. 10, he was first forced out and then locked out of the classroom for “peacefully not complying to wear a mask.”

The video taken by Hernandez shows his son sitting near a fence on the field after allegedly being denied entrance to his class.

“My son is out here by himself because of the whole mask thing,” Hernandez says Like in a segregationist community—the school district is denying an Hispanic kid and education?  Where is the ACLU and the Progressives?

Father, son frustrated with COVID mandate

Speakers come to defense of dad whose child was excluded from class because he wouldn’t wear a mask

By Michele Willer-Allred, ACORN, 1/21/22 

A video on social media showing a 9-year-old Garden Grove Elementary School student banned from class for not wearing a mask prompted an outcry at the Simi Unified School District Board of Trustees meeting on Tuesday.

Shortly after trustees appointed Hani Youssef as new superintendent effective July 1, many of the 20 speakers during the Zoom meeting voiced their frustration with the school district’s handling of the situation.

The student’s father, Timothy Hernandez, wrote on his Instagram account—which was open for public view—about his son being kicked out of school Jan. 7 for noncompliance with the state’s mask mandate, which the district says it is required to follow.

Hernandez said that when his son tried to return to the campus to get his schoolwork on Jan. 10, he was first forced out and then locked out of the classroom for “peacefully not complying to wear a mask.”

The video taken by Hernandez shows his son sitting near a fence on the field after allegedly being denied entrance to his class.

“My son is out here by himself because of the whole mask thing,” Hernandez says. “Today, (my son) refused to leave the campus because he wants to get his studies, he wants to get some kind of education, and they’re not allowing it.”

The video also shows Gene Colato, a school resource officer with the Simi Valley Police Department, approaching Hernandez to inform him that the school is requesting his son be taken home.

Colato explains the school district is citing an education code that states if a student refuses to wear a mask inside a classroom “it is a public health problem that excludes the student from being there.”

“Listen, I can’t say I wouldn’t be doing the same thing right now, but at the end of the day doing it during a school day when kids are on campus is not the time to do that fight,” Colato tells Hernandez.

“There is no fight. We’re not fighting. He’s trying to get an education,” Hernandez responds.

“You don’t care about his ADHD, his mental distress (and) everything else since all of this happened,” Hernandez says to Youssef, who is standing nearby in the video.

“I’m confused how they have that arbitrary power to kick (my son) out after he stated why he won’t wear a mask,” said Hernandez, adding that he couldn’t get a mask exemption from a doctor and that putting his son in independent studies doesn’t work.

Toward the end of the 19-minute video, Colato offered to be the middle man to help address the situation.

“There’s got to be something we can do on both ends so you’re satisfied and they’re satisfied,” Colato tells Hernandez, noting that he would speak with school officials to see what could be done. Going back and forth doesn’t get results, he says.

During Tuesday’s Zoom meeting, Hernandez, a combat veteran who served in Afghanistan, expressed his frustration to the board, calling them accomplices if they promote Youssef to superintendent. His son spoke briefly, too.

Several speakers expressed dismay over the district’s handling of the situation and the mask mandate, which they say doesn’t work to protect against COVID-19. They said masks should be a choice, not a mandate.

“(The student) was not sick or suffering. He was not a danger to anyone. I cannot believe that the district denies his right to his education,” said Simi Valley resident Elena Johnson.

Some speakers also asked why the district requires vaccines.

“To be clear, we do not have a vaccine mandate in place for students. It’s an optional mandate from the governor’s office,” said Superintendent Jason Peplinski.

Katie Weeks, a teacher at SVUSD, said she was happy with the safety regulations that have been put into place, especially because of the number of children who are not well at schools.

“I’m sad to hear that parents are upset, but it’s just to keep students and staff the safest we can be right now,” Weeks said in support of upholding the mask mandate.

Several trustees told the speakers that they were listening to their concerns.

In a phone interview with the Acorn Wednesday, Youssef said that he couldn’t speak about the incident with the minor student because of confidentiality reasons, but that he takes the concerns about the situation seriously.

He said the district is following mask guidelines to keep both students and adults safe on campuses.

“Why would we not comply with state and local mandates? These are not school district-generated mandates. The entire state of California is dealing with the same health and safety order. It’s not optional,” Youssef said.

He said the elected school board members are accountable for the health and safety of 16,000 students and 2,200 employees.

“They are legally, and they could be personally, liable for not following state and local guidelines,” Youssef said. “When you don’t have that level of accountability and responsibility, your opinion could be different.”

Youssef said he doesn’t want to see schools closed if they don’t follow the mandates. He also cited an incident involving Northern California’s Soulsbyville Elementary School District, which has been excluded from insurance coverage by the Tuolumne Joint Powers Authority for ignoring indoor masking and vaccine requirements.

“Where people are frustrated across the country (about vaccinations and masks), these things need to be taken and fought in court,” he said. “Your local school district doesn’t have that authority, although some believe that we do. We don’t.”

Governors in some states, like Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia, want to give parents the option to opt-out of mask mandates at school but are facing pushback from other lawmakers, school districts, and some parent groups, too.

As of Jan. 20, school officials and Hernandez were still at odds.

Hernandez was back outside of Garden Grove Elementary on Thursday morning, advocating for his son.

He told the Acorn his son was “segregated to a bench outside of class, where he is given the work but with no instruction.”

SVUSD is continuing to assess the matter.

“We are still exploring our legal options and requirements with this situation,” Youssef told the Acorn on Thursday.

Gavin Newsom on L.A. Rail Theft: ‘We Look Like a Third-world Country’

Finally, Gavin Newsom admits the truth—California under his leadership looks like a Third World country.  This is part of the explanation for the middle class fleeing the State—who wants to live in a State that is disease and crime ridden, homeless, slums and a government that laughs at its citizens?

““I’m asking myself, what the hell is going on? We look like a third-world country,” Newsom said, before apologizing for using the word “gangs” to describe the attacks on the trains, stressing that he did not mean the word in a “pejorative” way.”

He is embarrassed to use the phrase gangs—since he fears they will attack him.  California has no Governor, just a rich guy afraid of his own shadow.

Gavin Newsom on L.A. Rail Theft: ‘We Look Like a Third-world Country’

JOEL B. POLLAK, Breitbart,  1/22/22

LOS ANGELES, California — Governor Gavin Newsom professed shock and outrage as he visited the site of mass looting of cargo trains in L.A. on Thursday, helping clean up debris and touting his recent plan to help law enforcement fight theft.

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 19: A Union Pacific freight train passes along a section of tracks littered with debris from packages stolen from cargo containers stacked on rail cars on January 19, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. The area has seen numerous thefts of the containers aboard trains which sometimes are required to stop in the area on their way to other destinations. Union Pacific has seen a 160 percent increase in rail thefts in Los Angeles County over the past year. Many of the packages are from Amazon and other retailers. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

“I’m asking myself, what the hell is going on? We look like a third-world country,” Newsom said, before apologizing for using the word “gangs” to describe the attacks on the trains, stressing that he did not mean the word in a “pejorative” way.

As Breitbart News has reported, images and videos of torn boxes and packages were shared widely on social media last week as the country learned of the looting of cargo trains as the Union Pacific line slowed near L.A, providing a target to thieves in the absence of law enforcement.

Newsom joined workers in trying to clean up the mess, the latest in a series of media events where he has worked to clean graffiti and debris.

The Union Pacific rail line wrote to left-wing, George Soros-backed L.A. District Attorney George Gascón — whom Newsom endorsed — demanding better law enforcement and threatening to route trains elsewhere.

Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg has done little about the theft, while claiming credit for having “saved Christmas.”

In a statement, Newsom touted his “Real Public Safety Plan,” which proposes $255 million in grants to law enforcement agencies. It does not reverse the cuts to law enforcement undertaken by many Democrat-run cities, including L.A., where Mayor Eric Garcetti cut police funding by up to $150 million in response to the Black Lives Matter riots in the summer of 2020. Newsom also promoted his programs aimed at cleaning up the state and assisting “local litter abatement efforts.”

California Promotes Hiring of Teachers Based on Race—NOT Need or Quality

The Democrat Party in California has been the historic racist Party—they defended slavery.  They supported and created Jim Crow laws.  They used the KKK to stop blacks from voting.  Now, in the midst o a massive teacher shortage, the unions and Democrats owning our schools are spending money to hire black teachers—ONLY.

“Experts attribute the lack of Black K-12 teachers in California to a number of barriers, including underrepresentation in teacher credentialing programs, as well as workplace discrimination that prompts some to leave the profession.

As America attempts to reckon with racial injustice, some California school districts are adopting teacher pipeline programs specifically targeting potential Black teachers while also making efforts to retain teachers and listen to what might turn them away.

California Department of Education data shows that in the 2018-19 school year, the most recent year available, only 3.9% of public school teachers in the state — around 12,000 — were Black, according to Ed-Data. Meanwhile, Black students — about 335,000 — made up 5.4% of the state’s enrollment.

No one is stopping black college students from going into education—maybe they have seen the bigotry, hate and perversion of government schools and refuse to participate in the scam?

How California districts seek to recruit, retain Black teachers amid shortage

Photo courtesy [email protected], flickr

Experts blame the shortage on underrepresentation in colleges and discrimination on the job

ALI TADAYON, edSource,  1/21/22

for encouraging him to get his teaching credential.

A growing body of research shows that Black students who have at least one Black teacher growing up are more likely to graduate high school and enroll in college than those who don’t.

Yet California still woefully lacks Black teachers.

Experts attribute the lack of Black K-12 teachers in California to a number of barriers, including underrepresentation in teacher credentialing programs, as well as workplace discrimination that prompts some to leave the profession.

As America attempts to reckon with racial injustice, some California school districts are adopting teacher pipeline programs specifically targeting potential Black teachers while also making efforts to retain teachers and listen to what might turn them away.

California Department of Education data shows that in the 2018-19 school year, the most recent year available, only 3.9% of public school teachers in the state — around 12,000 — were Black, according to Ed-Data. Meanwhile, Black students — about 335,000 — made up 5.4% of the state’s enrollment.

Return to a calling

Michael Obah, a biology teacher at Oakland’s MetWest High School, said the lack of Black teachers in California is what inspired him to return to his “calling,” leaving behind a well-paid corporate accounting job in San Francisco. Obah was a high school teacher for five years in his home country of Ghana before immigrating to the United States in 2001.

“The amount of money I was making wasn’t what was giving me happiness,” Obah said. “I would read the news and see minorities struggling, people who look like me not being able to get jobs, homes, and going through a lot of struggle to be able to achieve in school.”

Obah said he was able to pursue the career change because of Oakland Unified’s Grow Our Own programs. The teacher residency program pays student teachers a $15,000 stipend while they earn their credentials and apprentice under a mentor. In addition to the stipend, Obah said he’s also received emotional support, job-site support, help with test preparation and interviews, and links with Oakland schools for jobs.

New programs to break barriers

Gov. Gavin Newsom and lawmakers allocated $350 million in the 2021-22 budget for one-time grants to develop new or expand existing teacher residency programs. UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education associate professor Travis Bristol, who chairs the state Department of Education’s Educator Diversity Advisory Group, said the cost of teacher preparation programs is one of the major barriers impeding the pipeline of Black teachers. The funding of residency programs indicates “some real focus” by the state on trying to remove that barrier, Bristol said.

Bristol said revenue surpluses in recent years and additional federal funding through the American Rescue Plan have put the state in a good financial position to invest in such programs. The state is also in a good political position for such efforts. State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond and State School Board President Linda Darling-Hammond have spoken in support of hiring more Black teachers.

“There is a policy moment to really move the needle on teacher diversity here in the state,” Bristol said.

Oakland Unified’s “pipeline” programs are working to attract, grow, develop and retain Black educators in the city, said Sarah Glasband, the district’s director of talent development, recruitment and retention. Pipelines are programs aimed at providing underrepresented groups the resources they need to enter specific professions.

Some of Oakland Unified’s programs are aimed at substitute teachers and other district employees who want to become teachers. The district also provides support for teachers going through alternative licensing routes, Glasband said, and offers debt relief, license test preparation and payment of tuition.

The result has been an increase in Black teacher net retention rates from 73% in 2016-17 to 86% in 2020-21.

During 2020-21, Black students made up 22.1% of Oakland Unified’s enrollment, and Black teachers made up 19.9% of the district’s teachers.

A long way to go

Obah, the biology teacher, said he saw the underrepresentation of Black teachers firsthand early in the credentialing process. He was the only person of color out of about 40 students in his teacher credential program for science at Cal State East Bay.

“My co-students were very inclusive, but there is always something in the background when you look around and you’re the only person of color,” he said.

A December 2020 analysis by TNTP (formerly The New Teacher Project) found that almost every state had higher percentages of teacher enrollees who identified as white when compared with white public school students. Nationally, enrollees at teacher preparation programs were nearly two-thirds white while public school students were 47% white.

Jacob Guthrie, who heads teacher recruitment, selection and retention for Los Angeles Unified’s Black Student Achievement Plan, said the underrepresentation of people of color – especially men of color – in higher education prompted the district to create its own in-house credentialing program, which is approved by the state’s Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The program has allowed substitute teachers, paraprofessionals, administrative assistants and even bus drivers to become credentialed teachers while earning a salary and benefits at their original jobs, Guthrie said.

Making a difference

Obah said he shares a special connection with Black students.

“I feel like they relate to me, and I relate to them,” he said. “They’re curious about Africa, our ancestry alone is a strong bond, and I think they see me in them, and they’re able to approach me more.”

He’s had Black students who say they participate more in his class than other classes. One day, Obah said, one student came to him in tears, saying he had suicidal thoughts and felt he “wasn’t proficient, wasn’t worthy.” Obah said he “seized the opportunity” and assured the student that there was nothing wrong with him — that it was up to teachers to present the class contents in a way that he can learn in a stress-free environment.

“I know for sure he bypassed other teachers and didn’t break down, but with me, he was vulnerable,” Obah said. “He talked to me, and I talked to him and was able to transfer him to a school psychologist who could help. For me, that was a powerful moment, a connection because he was a Black student, and I am a Black teacher.”

The toll on Black teachers

Deyango Harris, who teaches special education at Pleasant Hill’s College Park High School, has felt the weight of being the only Black teacher at his school. He was also the only Black teacher at the school he worked at previously.

Harris said that on multiple occasions he felt his concerns weren’t taken seriously and that he was treated unfairly because of his race. He said a series of incidents led him to file a discrimination complaint with the school’s human resources department. One issue was that he was the only teacher in his department who had to constantly move between classrooms, which Harris – who has been teaching for more than a decade – said is typically reserved for rookie teachers.

Adam Clark, superintendent of Mt. Diablo Unified School District — which encompasses College Park High — said via email that he and the district’s governing board are “committed to ensuring that all students, families and staff members feel safe and welcomed.” Clark would not comment on Harris’s situation.

“We take reports of discrimination seriously and follow board policies in all investigations,” Clark said.

If school administrators want to retain Black teachers, Harris said, they need to get serious about providing mental health support. And they need to understand the microaggressions they endure on a regular basis.

“They don’t realize the mental toll it takes on a Black educator, day in and day out, in a primarily white institution,” Harris said.

One of LA Unified’s focuses in retaining Black teachers is addressing what’s known as the “invisible tax” on Black male teachers, a concept former U.S. Education Secretary John King wrote about in the Washington Post in 2016. The invisible tax describes how Black teachers are subjected to stereotypes by non-Black co-workers, such as being assigned to handle disciplinary issues with Black students, or the assumption they want to be involved in athletics.

The district is offering professional development opportunities to principals to address this issue at their campuses and is holding focus groups for teachers to talk about their experiences and share suggestions with district administrators.

Harris said he’s committed to staying at the school in part because of his work with the school’s Black student union. He leads the student club, which is composed of about 60 students of different races. Harris keeps his classroom open during lunch for the club, plays music and allows students to filter in and out. Some Black students tell him that he’s the only adult they feel comfortable turning to, Harris said. The students also tell him that some feel racial aggressions, hear the N-word used on campus, and feel the incidents aren’t being disciplined appropriately.

“If I could be the African American male those students can look up to or look to for some cultural relevance, somebody who gets them, then I’m glad to do it. It’s not a begrudging kind of pressure, it’s a good pressure,” Harris said. “If it wasn’t for them, I would be gone already.”

Newsom Loses $20 Billion Chip Plant to Ohio

Little by little the California computer industry is being moved to other States.  Newsom just lost a $20 billion plant, with thousands of workers to Ohio.

“Computer chip maker Intel will reportedly be investing $20 billion to develop a new chip manufacturing site in New Albany, Ohio. Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger told TIME in an interview that the chipmaker expects the location to become “the largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet,” adding that the plant could expand to 2,000 acres. Gelsinger said that the new site could become the “Silicon Heartland.”

Newsom Loses $20 Billion Chip Plant to Ohio

California is on oits way to lose the computer industry—making us a Third World State.

‘Silicon Heartland:’ Intel Chooses Ohio to Build Largest Chip Factory ‘on the Planet’

Photo Courtesy of newfilm.dk, Flickr.

LUCAS NOLAN, reitbart,  1/21/22   

Computer chip maker Intel will reportedly be investing $20 billion to develop a new chip manufacturing site in New Albany, Ohio. Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger told TIME in an interview that the chipmaker expects the location to become “the largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet,” adding that the plant could expand to 2,000 acres. Gelsinger said that the new site could become the “Silicon Heartland.”

The Verge reports that chipmaker Intel will be spending $20 billion to construct a new chip manufacturing site in New Albany, Ohio, close to Columbus. The 1,000-acre manufacturing plant will contain two chip factories and will employ at least 3,000 people and “tens of thousands” more across suppliers and company partners.

Construction of the facility is set to begin this year, with the site becoming fully operational in 2025. Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger told TIME in an interview that the chipmaker expects the location to become “the largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet,” adding that the plant could expand to 2,000 acres. Gelsinger said that the new site could become the “Silicon Heartland.”

Intel is investing as much as $100 billion in the site over the next ten years and around $100 million as part of partnerships with Ohio universities, colleges, and the U.S. National Science Foundation to foster new talent.

Josh Mandel, who is leading the Republican primary race for Senate, commented on Twitter that: “Ohio has the brains and the brawn to lead a new American economy that brings prosperity to OUR citizens instead of to the Chinese Communist Party.”

Intel has multiple factories in the U.S. already, including in Oregon, New Mexico, and Arizona. The Ohio facility will be the first manufacturing expansion by Intel into a new state in over 40 years, according to the New York Times.

Intel has been massively increasing its investments in manufacturing capacity under the company’s new CEO, who previously announced a $20 billion expansion of the firm’s current Arizona complex.

Breitbart News previously reported that Gelsinger wants to restore Intel’s status as the leader of the semiconductor industry but doing so requires a number of manufacturing upgrades and the delivery of powerful new computer chips. Intel aims to restore the U.S. market share of chip manufacturing, which has dropped from 37 percent in 1990 to just 12 percent today. Gelsinger commented: “Over the decade in front of us, we should be striving to bring the US to 30% of worldwide semiconductor manufacturing.”

In June, the U.S. Senate approved a bill to provide $52 billion to U.S. semiconductor companies that are trying to keep manufacturing in the U.S.