Eber: Jim Crow on steroids

Until the 1960’s, Democrats in the South keep the black community segregated with Jim Crow laws.  It was hard for black to register to vote because of the Democrats.  Then until the last ten years or so, we were ending racist laws, opening everything to all citizen, regardless of color.  We used our schools to teach equality for all.

Today our schools are used to teach hate and bigotry based on race.  Even two plus two has become to the Democrats a symbol of white supremacy.  Believe in equality and you will be called as the BLM/ANTIFA and AOC do today, they call Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. an Uncle Tom, Justice Thomas WHITE and people like Dr. Thomas Sowell is an OREO: black on the outside and white on the inside.  There is a new class of racism—it is the radical BLM/ANTIFA and the young white radicals who hate themselves for being white.

We live in a racist and mentally ill society.

Jim Crow on steroids by Richard Eber

Richard Eber, Exclusive to the California Political News and Views,  7/29/21

A few years ago I anonymously attended an Antifa meeting in left leaning Berkeley.  As might be expected the rhetoric of hatred and ignorance was a modern version of the KKK.

Speaker after Speaker advocating the destruction of Israel amounted to “point of information” in their list of priorities of the radical group.

At the conclusion of the event, I approached a young female attorney of the Jewish faith who identified herself as an officer of Antifa.  My question to her was “As a Jew how can you support this group’s objectives which appear to be Hitler 101.  Don’t you know if these people ever gained power you would be the person they will arrest?”

As she turned away in disgust I was told “You just don’t understand. We are here for the people.  You are a lapdog of the capitalistic system and are destined to fail”.

Good grief!  Even as a suspect non practicing Jew, I was taken aback by this blatant misunderstanding   of history.

Things haven’t changed much since then. Despite gaining favor from the progressive arm of the Democratic Party, Antifa has continued their anarchistic Marxist ways. Their fermenting violence following the death of George Floyd from Minneapolis to Portland is definitely not a coincidence,

Antifa’s hatred of Israel has continued and has found itself manifesting itself as an important element of the pro Black Lives Matter (MLM) extremists in the ruling Bernie Sanders-Kamala Harris wing of the Democratic Party.

Despite the anti-Semitic rhetoric emanating from so called progressives, the Jewish Community has turned their back on the Pro-Israel policies of former President Donald Trump. Instead they have embraced those parties that have advocated for the destruction of Jewish homeland founded following WWII.

Apparently, they never read Albert Monrovia’s famous novel The Conformist which told the tail in Italy of those who ignored the rise of Mussolini.

Distorting history is an important element of radical leftists to influence public opinion.  Such tactics used to ferment revolution from within reminds one of “The Big Lie” methodology utilized by Nazis propaganda Chief Joseph Goebbels to influence public opinion in the 1930’s.

Such tactics utilized by Progressives is not limited to Jews Israel, or their buddies leading the charge in Communist Cuba.  They have hitched a ride on the Woke Bandwagon to distort American History. Canceling George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln while at the same time indoctrinating students with Critical Race Theory, is part of a carefully orchestrated plan to revolutionizing America from within.

The same people who blame the current unrest in Cuba on Covid-19 and the policies of Donald Trump, carry  around a fantasy that Republican conspirators are trying to disenfranchise African American and low income minority voters.  It matters not that the recent Georgia voting laws President Biden termed

 “Jim Crow laws on steroids” are considerably more liberal than similar regulations in Biden’s home state of Delaware.

With assistance from their codependents in the mass media “The Big Lie” is an important tool in the Leftist arsenal.  Evil is defined by labeling foes to be racists, Trump Republicans, sexists, homophobes, etc..

Nowhere in Democratic talking points are specifics pertaining to the Georgia voting laws or the ones being proposed in Texas.  It is assumed, especially with fund raising solicitations that the foes of Progressive ideologues are all right wing extremists who at best are borderline Nazis.

Were such a pronouncement true, instead of having one of the most inclusive way for citizens to cast their ballots, the Peach State would be digging up the graves of Bull Conner and Lester Maddox.  Instead, the senile CEO of the USA has referred to votingrights fight ‘the most significant test of our democracy since the Civil War”.

Huey!  Where do such bizarre theories come from?  I guess so called informed sources that brought us baseless Russian collusion charges during Donald Trump’s presidency or absurd pronouncements that the United States is racist State that blatantly discriminates against minorities in the name of White Privilege,

Isn’t it interesting that Donald Trump is impeached for allegedly holding out military aid to the Ukraine while his successor Joe Biden is doing the same thing now without a word of criticism from the media?

It is also noteworthy that the likes of Kamala Harris, Joe Biden and the Squad blame the current unrest in Cuba on Covid-19 and the policies of Donald Trump.  They completely ignore the concept of freedom from communism rule recently witnessed by demonstrations on the streets of Havana and Miami.

One would surmise these political leaders don’t want to anger their base with talk that Communism is a failed system of government which has never worked anywhere ever! This is especially true in California where Gavin Newsom, Toni Adkins, and Scott Weiner, are tone death rejecting Marxist ideology.

It is also not a coincidence that those who are alumni of the old Soviet Union, China, and Cuba who immigrate to the United States, seldom register to vote as Democrats.

Ex members of the Communist party almost all find themselves in the conservative camp.

Maybe I am missing something.  It is difficult to comprehend the United States is still trying to l do business with a terrorist country such as Iran who funds Hamas. At the same time the Liberals in D.C. condemn Israel for trying to survive surrounded by hostile neighbors.

It also confuses me why President Biden halts construction of Excel Pipeline while allowing Russia to complete a similar project carrying energy to Germany from Russia.

Meanwhile on the domestic front Democratic leaders still find themselves supporting Critical Race Theory and most of the Woke talking points rewriting history while harboring guilt for harboring alleged White Supremacy.

What to do?

For a start Republican, Independents, and moderate Democrats need to band together and boot these demagogic ideologues out of Congress in the mid-term elections next year.

This same group will have to put Professional Football, the NBA, Major League Baseball, and much of news media in the circular file.  These groups and others, who have embraced hatred of America, need to be boycotted until they come to their senses.

What is transpiring in America today is a cultural war for which the outcome will likely determine the future success or failure for democracy as we know it.  This is a cause well worth fighting for.

LAX’s Bogus Bottle Ban

Junk science is based on making people either feel good or feel bad.  Either way, liars, misrepresentations and claims of science are used.  Not to help the community, but to control it.

“To start, the policy is confusing. Supposedly, it is intended to fight plastic pollution. But the airport leadership isn’t really banning plastic at all. If they wanted to get rid of plastic, they would forbid the sale of soda bottles, food wrappers, hand sanitizer bottles, and other plastic items — all of which they are not doing. In fact, they are targeting a class of items (thin plastic water bottles) that are widely accepted for recycling. 

Another reason this policy is bogus is that plastic, despite its reputation, actually isn’t the most environmentally unfriendly material. The alternatives of glass, cartons, or aluminum carry as much environmental harm as plastic — or more.

We need to laugh at government when they lie and try to harm us.  No need to follow regulations based on politics, not science.  Based on control of the population not what is good for us?  The good news is that the Left and Right in America has caught on—government is a paper tiger.

LAX’s Bogus Bottle Ban

By Will Coggin, Essential Products Coalition, Exclusive to the California Political News and Views. 7/29/21 .

From rising crime to drugs and excrement in the street, many people are realizing San Francisco’s style of policymaking that puts “virtue signaling” ahead of the quality of life isn’t worth following. Los Angeles hasn’t gotten the memo.  

LAX and Van Nuys Airport have decided to follow in San Francisco International Airport’s misguided footsteps to ban plastic water bottles from their facilities by 2023. Businesses and vending machines in the airport will be forbidden from selling plastic water bottles, though they will still be allowed to sell plastic, sugar-filled soda bottles. 

For an airport to think bottles are the real environmental problem is laughable. It would be like a coal power plant installing a bike rack for its employees.

It’s another victory for style over substance. This policy will inconvenience travelers, and it won’t do anything to help the planet. 

To start, the policy is confusing. Supposedly, it is intended to fight plastic pollution. But the airport leadership isn’t really banning plastic at all. If they wanted to get rid of plastic, they would forbid the sale of soda bottles, food wrappers, hand sanitizer bottles, and other plastic items — all of which they are not doing. In fact, they are targeting a class of items (thin plastic water bottles) that are widely accepted for recycling. 

Another reason this policy is bogus is that plastic, despite its reputation, actually isn’t the most environmentally unfriendly material. The alternatives of glass, cartons, or aluminum carry as much environmental harm as plastic — or more.

Glass production emits significant amounts of greenhouse gases. Because glass is so heavy, it also uses more fossil fuels in transportation. Researchers from the Centre for Environmental Policy at Imperial College London found that replacing every plastic bottle with glass would release as much additional carbon dioxide as 22 large coal-fired power plants. Unbroken glass is recyclable, at least in some cities. But PET plastic can also be recycled and it doesn’t carry the risk of shattering in the jet bridge.  

Aluminum isn’t any better. Aluminum production emits twice as much carbon dioxide as plastic. The carbon is bad, but the sourcing of aluminum is even worse. Aluminum is made of bauxite ore harvested from foreign open-face strip mines. As miners dig for the bauxite, they kick up a thick red dust. The dust is so toxic it can poison the nearby water supply and kill the vegetation in the area, including the crops of small farmers. The people who live near the mine are at an increased risk of lethal diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. 

Aluminum can be recycled, but just like plastic, it isn’t always placed in the proper bin. The recycling rate for aluminum containers and packaging is 34.9 percent, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The recycling rate for PET plastic, the resin used in clear bottles, is similar at 29.1 percent. Even when aluminum is recycled, it is one of the materials most likely to be improperly sorted at recycling sorting facilities. One in four cans is sent to a landfill, according to the Can Manufacturers Institute

Cartons, which have been popular for boxed water, have recycling difficulties of their own. Nearly 40 percent of Americans live in areas where cartons cannot be recycled. Cartons are difficult to recycle because they are made of glued layers of plastic, paper, and aluminum. A study from the Danish Environmental Protection Agency found it is better for the environment for cartons to be incinerated rather than recycled. 

No matter how much environmentalists may hate it, travelers still need to eat and drink between flights. Zero waste is not an option. 

The question becomes how can airports do as little damage to the environment as possible while recognizing that absurd goals of zero-waste and carbon neutrality are unrealistic. Banning water bottles is not the answer to that question. In fact, it will make the problem worse. A better solution would be ensuring that every single-use product is recycled to exist in multiple ways. 

Will Coggin is the managing director of the Essential Plastics Coalition.

Top 10 Reasons You Should Just Turn Your Guns Over To The Government TODAY

The police can not protect a former U.S. Senator, why would you expect them to protect you?  Most cops are afraid of financial ruin with every arrest or shootout with a criminal.  The criminal will be let go, it is the cop that is arrested.  So folks now understand they are responsible for their own safety—government will not protect you.

1) The government is very trustworthy and would never hurt anyone: Also, they have nukes. Resistance is futile. Just hand ’em over! 

2) With your gun safe empty, you now have a neat place to hide when robbers break into your home: Let your gun safe keep YOU safe! As an added bonus, you can now use your gun safe to store all your surgical masks and vaccination cards! 

While this was written in satire—these are actually arguments by the Democrats as to why you should turn in your gins.  Once you do that, you are as safe as a Jew in Nazi Germany.

Top 10 Reasons You Should Just Turn Your Guns Over To The Government TODAY

BabylonBee.com, 7/26/21 

So, you still have guns in your house, huh?

First of all, shame on you. Second of all, we realize you may be slightly hesitant about just turning them all over to the government, so we put together a list of reasons (out of the hundreds of reasons) you should just turn in your guns right now. Read and learn, you bitter clinger! 

1) The government is very trustworthy and would never hurt anyone: Also, they have nukes. Resistance is futile. Just hand ’em over! 

2) With your gun safe empty, you now have a neat place to hide when robbers break into your home: Let your gun safe keep YOU safe! As an added bonus, you can now use your gun safe to store all your surgical masks and vaccination cards! 

3) Instead of shooting clays on Thanksgiving, you can play great games with your family, like Monopoly: Nothing brings a family together like Monopoly!

4) The government needs your guns so they can shoot people trying to sell loose cigarettes: Donate your firearms to the noble cause of fighting the evil forces trying to sell untaxed cigarettes to people who can’t afford a full pack!

5) You can spend the time you used to spend at the gun range educating yourself: With time, maybe you can learn to be less problematic. 

6) The government will donate your guns to a noble cause: Like drug cartels and insurgents in the Middle East. Think of how much good your gun could be doing right now in the government’s hands! 

7) You can rest assured knowing that criminals will turn in their guns too: Criminals always do the right thing when given the chance. 

8) Now you can defend your home with a cool spiked mace and broadsword: Come on—who doesn’t want to do this? Turn in your gun and defend your home like a REAL man. 

9) You’ll be a rich man not having to buy ammo: Aren’t you tired of getting in fights with your wife about how much you spend on guns and ammo? Plus, you’ll have more money to spend on masks! 

10) What’s the worst that could happen? Just give it a try! Could be fun, actually! 

Former Uber-Liberal Senator Barbara Boxer Assaulted, Robbed in Oakland

Barbara Boxer as a Senator did not like the police, wanted more prisoners on criminals on the streets.  She thought the problem was economic, not meanness.  She was attack near Jack London Square in Oakland, a place where tourists visit.  Wonder if after she was attacked if she called the police or BLM?

“The former Democrat senator’s office confirmed the mugging on Monday afternoon.

“Earlier today former Senator Barbara Boxer was assaulted in the Jack London Square neighborhood of Oakland. The assailant pushed her in the back, stole her cell phone and jumped in a waiting car. She is thankful that she was not seriously injured,” Boxer’s office said.

Oakland police are investigating the case and Crime Stoppers of Oakland offered a $2,000 reward for info leading to an arrest.

Anyone with information on the mugging that took place along the 300 block of 3rd Street is asked to contact Crime Stoppers TIP LINE at (510) 777- 8572.

Note the reward to find the culprit—Crime Stoppers does not do this for others.  In fact, even if caught, the criminal cannot be arrested—the phone stolen is worth under $950—so based on a law Boxer supported, the thief will not go to jail or even see the inside of a squad car.  Boxer is now a victim of her policy.

Former Uber-Liberal Senator Barbara Boxer Assaulted, Robbed in Oakland

By Cristina Laila, Gateway Pundit,  7/26/21  

Former California Senator Barbara Boxer was assaulted and robbed in Oakland’s Jack London Square neighborhood on Monday.

Boxer, 80, was pushed in her back and the assailant stole her cell phone then took off in a getaway car.

Advertisement – story continues below

The former Democrat senator’s office confirmed the mugging on Monday afternoon.

“Earlier today former Senator Barbara Boxer was assaulted in the Jack London Square neighborhood of Oakland. The assailant pushed her in the back, stole her cell phone and jumped in a waiting car. She is thankful that she was not seriously injured,” Boxer’s office said.

Oakland police are investigating the case and Crime Stoppers of Oakland offered a $2,000 reward for info leading to an arrest.

Anyone with information on the mugging that took place along the 300 block of 3rd Street is asked to contact Crime Stoppers TIP LINE at (510) 777- 8572.

Oakland city council recently voted to defund the police and strip more than $18 million from the OPD’s budget.

Crime has increased 90% in the Democrat hell hole of Oakland.

Barbara Boxer served as a US Senator until 2017. Kamala Harris filled her seat.

COVID spreading fast in well-vaccinated California counties

Now you know why Newsom and many counties demand you wear a worthless mask outside and inside.  Watch TV in the den?  Wear a mask.  Go to a restaurant, wear a mask, except when you put food in your mouth.  Kids going to school—must wear a mask though it will harm them.

All of this because Newsom and friends do not believe the vaccine has any value—except to control the public.  In L.A. County 20% of those vaccinated get the virus.  San Diego has an 11% rate.  Any other drug with such a high failure rate (not to mention hundreds of dead bodies in its wake) would be taken off the market—but one drug  company added $3 billion in profits to its bottom line using an experimental drug.

“Five California counties have both a higher percentage of their eligible residents fully vaccinated and a higher average daily case rate than the statewide average: Los Angeles, San Diego, Alameda, Contra Costa and San Francisco. The five counties with falling case rates — Modoc, Glenn, Lassen, Del Norte, San Benito — have below-average vaccination rates.

That doesn’t mean the vaccines don’t work — rates for infection and hospitalization remain vastly higher among the unvaccinated. So what’s going on? Experts point to two things: the extraordinary ease with which the virus’ now-dominant delta strain spreads, and the fact that no vaccine offers impenetrable protection.

Junk science.  These same folks having the same data on other drugs, would demand the drug be withdrawn from public use.  In this case too much money is at stake to allow the health of the community to be a consideration.

COVID spreading fast in well-vaccinated California counties

Cases are falling in five counties with below-average vaccination

By John Woolfolk , Bay Area News Group, 7/24/21 

California and its big coastal cities have embraced vaccines to beat back the COVID-19 pandemic. But a Bay Area News Group analysis shows not only are cases rising fast in much of the Golden State, they are soaring in many urban counties that boast high vaccination rates.

Five California counties have both a higher percentage of their eligible residents fully vaccinated and a higher average daily case rate than the statewide average: Los Angeles, San Diego, Alameda, Contra Costa and San Francisco. The five counties with falling case rates — Modoc, Glenn, Lassen, Del Norte, San Benito — have below-average vaccination rates.

That doesn’t mean the vaccines don’t work — rates for infection and hospitalization remain vastly higher among the unvaccinated. So what’s going on? Experts point to two things: the extraordinary ease with which the virus’ now-dominant delta strain spreads, and the fact that no vaccine offers impenetrable protection.

“I am not so surprised that transmission rates are not neatly tracking immunization rates,” said Dr. Stephen Luby, a medical professor specializing in infectious diseases at Stanford University.

“There are a number of issues that contribute to transmission,” Luby said. “In high density urban settings, for example, even with a higher level of vaccine coverage, there can still be a lot of exposure to unvaccinated folks and potentially to folks who are vaccinated but are asymptomatically shedding the delta variant.”

The soaring case rates spurred action and pleas this past week from public health officials in the Bay Area and politicians in some of the most vaccine-resistant parts of the country. Health officials in Santa Clara, San Francisco and Contra Costa counties urged employers to require vaccinations for all workers. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell implored the unvaccinated to get their shots and ignore “demonstrably bad advice,” while the Republican governor of Alabama — the least-vaccinated state in the country — said “it’s time to start blaming the unvaccinated folks” for the virus’s continued surge.

The delta variant, which devastated India in the spring, is highly contagious and has since spread globally and throughout the U.S. and California where it accounted for 82.8% of sequenced viral specimens as of Wednesday, up from 48.8% a month earlier.

There have been mixed reports about the vaccines’ effectiveness against the variant, most of which indicate they still offer broad protection, and case rates show the fully vaccinated remain well protected.

The California Department of Public Health reported Friday that between January 1 and July 14, 99% of the state’s cumulative cases have been among unvaccinated people. For the week of July 7-14, the average daily case rate per 100,000 among unvaccinated Californians was 13 while the rate for the vaccinated was 2, the CDPH said.

A similar picture emerges locally. In Contra Costa County, which reports case rates by vaccination status, the average rate per 100,000 among the unvaccinated was 27.8 on July 16 — six times the 4.5 rate reported in the vaccinated population. In Sonoma County, the rate was 15.1 among the unvaccinated, and 3.7 for the vaccinated.

But although the vaccines do a good job bolstering the body’s ability to fight infection, they aren’t impenetrable shields. Because vaccinated people are being exposed to higher levels of a more contagious variant circulating in densely populated urban areas, their chances for contracting one of the few vaccine “breakthrough” infections are greater.

“The best, most waterproof raincoat is protective, but not when it’s storming outside or you’re in the middle of a hurricane,” said Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, a professor of epidemiology at UC San Francisco.

She and Luby added that some vaccinated people may be spreading the virus without knowing they have it while their bodies fight it off.

And since California’s June 15 reopening, when the state retired its face mask mandate and color-coded system of pandemic restrictions based on case rates, people have been venturing out more without masks to stores, restaurants and events that no longer have pandemic crowd limits. Although many people still use masks in places like the Bay Area, that can only do so much.

“It’s definitely depressing to see how quickly things turned,” Bibbins-Domingo said. “But the threat of the virus has always been there. Delta is a highly transmissible variant, something we have to respect. Even with some of the masking, we’re moving around a lot, we’re going along with our usual patterns of behavior. Put those together and you can quickly see, even though we’re wearing masks, we have vaccination, there’s no margin for error any more.”

While vaccination levels are relatively high in California and the big cities where the virus is spreading, there still are many who haven’t had or can’t get the shots.

According to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, California’s 61.1% vaccination rate of those 12 and older compares favorably to the 55.3% in Florida and 53% in Texas, and isn’t far behind New York’s 65.4%. But many, including kids under 12 and people with medical issues, can’t get the shots. Just over half California’s nearly 40 million people — 52.1% — are fully immunized.

“Once you put in the full population denominator, it’s not as high as we think,” Bibbins-Domingo said.

The rapidly worsening pandemic picture — coming at a time when many hoped the virus would be a fading memory — has led many health experts to call on federal and state authorities to reverse course and impose more face mask requirements and restrictions.

Both the CDC and California Department of Public Health have maintained that the answer remains simply getting more people vaccinated. But resistance among some people will be hard to overcome.

For now, many local health officials have been stepping in, urging people to resume wearing masks indoors, where the virus spreads more easily, regardless of vaccination, and employers to require that their workers get the shots. Some businesses, including San Francisco bar owners, are considering requiring their customers provide proof of vaccination, fearing a return of the pandemic restrictions that closed them down entirely.

Health experts like Bibbins-Domingo support all of that, and sympathize with the messaging dilemma facing public health officials.

“The challenge in public health communication is we ultimately do want more people to be vaccinated,” Bibbins-Domingo said. “And the concern is communicating that we also need to wear a mask right now will then dilute the message that we need to be vaccinated. The challenge is that both things are true.”

11% of positive coronavirus tests in San Diego County are from vaccinated people

No wonder Newsom and Biden want you to wear the worthless masks—the vaccine is NOT working.  In L.A. County 20% of those vaccinated get the virus.  In San Diego it is “only” 11%.  No experimental drug with more than a 1% failure rate is allowed to stay on the market.  Plus, this drug has killed hundreds if not thousands of people. NO other drug has been allowed on the market that killed as many.

“With updated numbers expected Monday, San Diego County’s Health and Human Services Agency was seeing a significant spike in COVID-19 cases, as the most recent data showed 1,264 new infections — the highest total since Feb. 5.

Despite boasting over our high vaccination rates, San Diego County Health officials are once again warning against rising numbers, and specifically blaming the unvaccinated.

The most recent numbers were released Friday. In the 30 days between June 21 and July 20, 6,572 San Diegans tested positive for COVID-19. Of that group, 11% were fully vaccinated, while 89% were not.

Something is wrong and government refuses to recognize it.  It is time for the people to use their common sense and real science.

11% of positive coronavirus tests in San Diego County are from vaccinated people

KUSI Newsroom, 7/26/21  

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – With updated numbers expected Monday, San Diego County’s Health and Human Services Agency was seeing a significant spike in COVID-19 cases, as the most recent data showed 1,264 new infections — the highest total since Feb. 5.

Despite boasting over our high vaccination rates, San Diego County Health officials are once again warning against rising numbers, and specifically blaming the unvaccinated.

The most recent numbers were released Friday. In the 30 days between June 21 and July 20, 6,572 San Diegans tested positive for COVID-19. Of that group, 11% were fully vaccinated, while 89% were not.

“We are facing a pandemic of the unvaccinated,” said San Diego County Board of Supervisors Chair Nathan Fletcher. “A vast majority of the increase in cases are from those who are unvaccinated and they account for nearly all of the hospitalizations. The way to slow the increase and protect yourself is to trust your doctor and get a vaccine.”

On June 21, just 56 new cases of the virus were reported. On July 7, the number of new cases crossed the 200 mark and has not receded.

“The vaccines are effective in preventing severe illness or death from COVID-19,” said Dr. Wilma Wooten, county public health officer. “If you have not gotten vaccinated, the time to get vaccinated is now. If you are late for your second dose, the time to get that second shot is now.”

Community outbreaks, hospitalizations and ICU admissions were also up dramatically. The county Friday reported an additional two community outbreaks, bringing the total number of outbreaks in the previous seven days to 25. One month earlier, on June 23, only five community outbreaks were reported.

A total of 98% of hospitalizations in the last 30 days are in individuals who are not vaccinated or have not completed the full series of the two-dose vaccine, according to the Friday data.

“In the last few weeks, individuals who were not fully vaccinated against COVID-19 were seven times more likely to contract the virus,” said Dr. Seema Shah, medical director of HHSA’s Epidemiology and Immunization Services branch. “The more infectious Delta variant is on its way to becoming the dominant strain among San Diego County residents and a single dose of the vaccine is only about 30% effective in protecting people from getting sick.”

Despite the increase in cases and hospitalizations, there was no word from county officials regarding a return to the mask mandate, as Los Angeles did earlier this month. But that is certainly still a possibility. San Diego County leaders have been mysteriously quiet on that topic, and have not yet said they would not re-implement one.

Close to 150,000 San Diegans are only partially vaccinated and overdue for their second shot. The county is working with medical providers to help them remind patients and is also using the San Diego Immunization Registry to develop follow-up reminders for those who are behind schedule.

Newsom to DA’s: Here is $18 Million to Get Criminals Out of Prison

Guv Newsom has already announced he is going to release another 72,000 criminals from our prisoners—more than half we have today.  DA’s like Gascon and Boudin are refusing to prosecute criminals, instead proving social workers.  California is experiencing a massive crime wave—and terrorists like the BLM/ANTIFA know they can loot, burn and riot without worries about police arresting them.  No wonder gun sales have exploded in the former Golden State.

“A new state-funded program encourages district attorneys to resentence some incarcerated people serving long prison terms that many now consider excessive.

Nine DAs throughout California — including those in San Francisco, Santa Clara and Contra Costa counties — will receive a portion of an $18 million pot earmarked in the recently approved state budget to help identify inmates who are no longer deemed a public safety risk, but still have years left behind bars.

“Most prosecutors agree that if a person has transformed their life and there’s no justification for having them incarcerated, then they should be out,” said Hillary Blout, executive director of For The People, a sentencing reform group that is working with the DAs to help identify eligible inmates.

Thanks to Newsom and these DA’s, even Barbara Boxer, a promoter of demeaning the police, became a crime victim in Oakland.  Maybe she now has a different perspective.  I wonder if she called the cops for help?

New State Funding Boosts Prosecutor-Led Resentencing Efforts in California

Matthew Green, KQED,   7/26/21  

A new state-funded program encourages district attorneys to resentence some incarcerated people serving long prison terms that many now consider excessive.

Nine DAs throughout California — including those in San Francisco, Santa Clara and Contra Costa counties — will receive a portion of an $18 million pot earmarked in the recently approved state budget to help identify inmates who are no longer deemed a public safety risk, but still have years left behind bars.

“Most prosecutors agree that if a person has transformed their life and there’s no justification for having them incarcerated, then they should be out,” said Hillary Blout, executive director of For The People, a sentencing reform group that is working with the DAs to help identify eligible inmates.

“That prosecutor can bring the case back to the court and essentially say, ‘Your honor, our agency asked you to send this person away and we’re here now asking you to send this person home,’ ” Blout said.

‘Most prosecutors agree that if a person has transformed their life and there’s no justification for having them incarcerated, then they should be out.’Hillary Blout, executive director of For The People

The funding is intended to implement Assembly Bill 2942, a 2018 law that Blout helped draft, which allows district attorneys to recommend that courts reconsider old cases and issue new, lighter sentences — including for people convicted of violent crimes years ago.

Some 75 incarcerated people in California have so far been resentenced under the law, according to Blout. In most cases, it’s led to their near-immediate release from prison and reentry back into their communities on parole.

That includes about 50 people from San Francisco alone, according to Arcelia Hurtado, chief of the post-conviction unit in the San Francisco DA’s Office. She said her staff is working with the Public Defender’s Office and community groups to review the sentences of the nearly 200 people from San Francisco who have already served over 20 years — about a third of the current prison population from the city. Some of those cases, she added, are women who committed violent crimes against their abusers.

“Many years ago, courts just didn’t hear that information or just didn’t give it proper weight,” Hurtado said, noting that her office will likely use the new state funding to hire a dedicated team to review the cases and develop a strong reentry program for people who are released.

The state’s investment in the program signals a shift away from the harsh sentencing policies of past decades, when laws like mandatory minimums and three strikes sparked an explosion in the prison population, mushrooming from about 50,000 inmates in 1985 to a peak of 173,000 in 2006.

“Our legacy in California has not been a great one in terms of our investment in building prisons and then filling them with people,” Blout said, noting the disproportionate impact that’s had on people of color.

But in recent years, the state has advanced a slew of criminal justice reforms aimed at reducing the prison population.

“But by and large, with all of those efforts, it historically had been prosecutors that were seen as the barrier to really being able to see the promise of these initiatives,” said Blout, who worked for years as a prosecutor in the San Francisco DA’s Office. “I think that if we’re ever going to get our system to a place where we are effectively implementing all of the different laws at our disposal, we have to have one of the most powerful actors in the criminal justice system involved, and that’s prosecutors.”

The nine DA’s offices in the pilot program, which also include Los Angeles, Merced, San Diego, Humboldt, Riverside and Yolo counties, were chosen to reflect California’s diverse geography and demographics, Blout said, and to show that the model can be applied across the state and the country. In just the last year, two other states — Oregon and Illinois — have followed California’s lead, passing similar resentencing laws.

After AB 2942 went into effect in 2019, Blout’s organization began working directly with the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office to begin reviewing cases and develop risk-assessment protocols.

Kennard Love, from San Jose, was one of the inmates who quickly rose to the top of the list of eligible participants. In 2007, at the age of 19, he was convicted of multiple armed robberies and sentenced to 28 years in prison.

At San Quentin State Prison, he earned associate’s degrees in business, behavioral and social science, and math and joined The Last Mile program, which teaches computer coding to prisoners.

Working with Silicon Valley De-Bug, a criminal justice reform organization that helps support incarcerated people, Blout’s group advocated for Love, and in December 2020, the Santa Clara DA’s Office recommended to a court that he be resentenced. Within days, he walked out prison, on parole.

“He decided to make a change in his life,” said Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeffrey Rosen, who oversaw the resentencing effort. “I want to reward and incentivize other inmates to make that change, because that change is good for them and it’s good for our community, because somebody who’s now not a criminal, not robbing, not stealing means that there are fewer crime victims.”

Rosen’s office has successfully petitioned to have 12 people resentenced since 2019 – a relatively modest figure that he said reflects the time it takes to carefully evaluate cases and do thorough risk assessments to guarantee public safety. And despite the inherently politically fraught business of releasing people from prison early, particularly those convicted of violent offenses, Rosen said he hasn’t yet faced much pushback.

“Of course, this isn’t something we do lightly. We talk to victims’ families,” Rosen said. “And sometimes victims are very supportive of the early release. Sometimes they don’t care so much one way or another, they’ve moved on. And sometimes they’re concerned. I haven’t had a victim say, ‘Oh, absolutely not. That person should rot in prison forever.’ “

The resentencing program, Rosen added, is a validation of his job as a prosecutor.

“Our commitment is to do justice. And it doesn’t end after the conviction,” he said. “And while there certainly are cases we prosecuted where we think a person was not sentenced to enough time in prison, certainly we must acknowledge that there’s cases where someone was sentenced to too long in prison. And this law is an opportunity for us to redress that and to provide a fuller justice.”

An unwinnable bidding war: How Modesto’s housing crisis prices out would-be homebuyers

Modesto is a wonderful, quiet, but growing community.  Housing, until recently was comparatively cheap versus the rest of California.  Now that San Fran is closing down, people can work remotely instead of going to an office, the city has experienced a housing boom—pricing out locals who want to stay in town.

“In Modesto, the housing inventory has been shorting by over 1,000 units a year since the recession, said Daniel Del Real, a broker associate with PMZ Real Estate.

Add to that a nationwide rise in lumber and construction costs, which in turn increases selling prices even further, and homeownership for couples like Jones and her fiancé looks increasingly out of reach. For a young couple on a budget of roughly $250,000 to $300,000, securing a house in a market where the median sales prices routinely exceed $400,000 is a challenge.

“We need to find the right house for us and something that we’re comfortable in, rather than getting stuck in something that we can’t afford later on down the road,” she said.

While this story is about Modesto, the price of homes in San Diego has risen 25% in just the past year.  California has become totally unaffordable.

An unwinnable bidding war: How Modesto’s housing crisis prices out would-be homebuyers

By Kristina Karisch, Modesto Bee,  7/22/21

.

For Tiffiny Jones and her fiance, the past few months have been marked by milestones. The couple is expecting their first child in the next few weeks, and they’ve been looking to buy their first home together.

But months of house-hunting have proved frustrating: With high prices and even higher demand, finding a home in or around Modesto feels like an impossible task. After scouring homes online for months and attending showings, only to see multiple offers on properties that went well above the asking price, Jones and her fiance have put their dream on the back burner.

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 “There’s not a lot of three-bedroom houses available,” she said. “The housing markets are not where they were a few years ago.”

Jones and her fiance’s experience is mirrored by many individuals and families in Modesto and across the country. A nationwide inventory shortage has sent housing prices skyrocketing, and the COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to a surge of movement from higher- to lower-priced regions as people look for houses with more space to raise their families.

According to a recent FreddieMac report, the U.S. had a housing supply deficit of 3.8 million units as of the fourth quarter of 2020. Between 2018 and 2020, the housing stock deficit increased by approximately 52%, the report found.

In Modesto, the housing inventory has been shorting by over 1,000 units a year since the recession, said Daniel Del Real, a broker associate with PMZ Real Estate.

Add to that a nationwide rise in lumber and construction costs, which in turn increases selling prices even further, and homeownership for couples like Jones and her fiance looks increasingly out of reach. For a young couple on a budget of roughly $250,000 to $300,000, securing a house in a market where the median sales prices routinely exceed $400,000 is a challenge.

“We need to find the right house for us and something that we’re comfortable in, rather than getting stuck in something that we can’t afford later on down the road,” she said.

In June, the median home prices in both Stanislaus County and Modesto reached over $400,000. Across the county, the median selling price for homes was $429,000, with a median price in Modesto at $415,000, according to data from TrendVision.

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For Del Real, these conditions spell out an uncertain future for Modesto and the Central Valley.

“If we maintain the status quo, you’re going to see an exodus of young people,” he said. “We’re going to lose residents to cities … that streamline the process and make it happen. They’re just going to go down the street.”

A crisis a decade in the making

In the Central Valley, the 2008 financial crisis decimated the housing market. California was among the states most heavily hit by the housing bubble — precipitated by mass mortgage lending, dubious subprime operations and ballooning home values.

California’s housing prices suffered their fastest and steepest fall in 25 years in 2007, sinking 6.6% in a year.

Locally, home prices dropped more than 15% in 2007 in the areas of Merced, Modesto and Stockton, marking, according to a report from the Public Policy Institute of California, “the largest one‐year decline of any California metro area in at least 30 years.” These declines reversed some of the pre-crash gains in home prices.

The ensuing recession hit the Central Valley especially hard. The financial crisis caused the local unemployment rate — which is normally above average compared to the rest of the state — to skyrocket. Modesto hit joblessness rates of over 17% during the recession, and the city, along with Stockton and Fresno, ranked among the top 10 “weakest performing” metro regions nationwide.

At the same time, construction nearly stopped.

In Modesto, housing permits fell 63% from 2004 to 2007, according to the PPIC report.

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Modesto was issuing between 400 and 1,800 permits annually, with a spike around the turn of the millennium, according to city data.

In 2006, the city issued 415 housing permits; in 2007, the number went up to 574. By 2008, only 113 permits were issued citywide, and the numbers dropped into the double digits by 2009. It took until 2016, over half a decade later, for Modesto to once again issue over 100 permits.

In 2020, the city awarded 224.

This decade-long pause in construction has taken its toll on the region. Del Real estimates the city is short over 11,000 housing units, and with the current rate of development, it’s nowhere close to being able to fill the gap.

New homes are quickly being bought at The Trails in the Village One neighborhood in Modesto, Calif., on Friday, July 16, 2021. Andy Alfaro [email protected]

New plans to revitalize old processes

Jessica Hill, Modesto’s community development manager, said the city is reevaluating its housing priorities as it works to update its general plan, or long-term outlook for the city.

Modesto is bringing on a consultant firm to look into city processes and assess opportunities to streamline development and help facilitate housing affordability.

According to the proposal, the general plan will address key issues such as expanding Modesto’s economic base, clarifying future growth areas and implementing the city’s recent downtown master plan, among others. Hill said the plan will serve as a “roadmap for us to really look at how we can improve our internal processes and how we can be proactive in different policy decisions that are coming down on the federal and state level.”

“We do recognize we’re constrained right now by the current boundaries of the city of Modesto and we understand that we still want to research and find different growth areas,” she said.

This overhaul of the general plan will allow Modesto to re-prioritize what kind of housing is developed, said Councilman Chris Ricci, because the current plans and goals have been in place for years.

Current projects in the pipeline tend toward sprawling developments of single-family homes, he said, which don’t always fit the community’s housing needs.

“These things have been planned over many decades, and so they reflect the values of the decades in which they were created,” Ricci said. “That filters all the way down from the plan to the planning commission to the developers, so that even the projects we’re working on today reflect that vision.”

The recession, coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic, have fundamentally changed housing needs. With work from home at an all-time high and thousands looking for more affordable, larger homes for their families, Modesto is seeing an influx of transplants from other parts of the state — largely the Bay Area and Sacramento.

Michael Zagaris, the president of PMZ Real Estate, said this pattern creates “a conflict in which a lot of the local people are being priced out of housing by the people from the Bay Area. It’s a cascade effect.”

Bay Area buyers bring with them more purchasing power, and low interest rates are allowing buyers to access homes that would otherwise be out of their price ranges. With a lack of supply, homes can attract multiple offers in a matter of hours once they’re on the market, and most come in above the asking price.

But Modesto, which along with other Central Valley towns has historically served as a commuter city for Bay Area workers, won’t necessarily serve that function forever.

Ricci said priorities for development need to shift away from serving “cities that work great with single-family homes” where “you get in your car and you drive to work 100 miles away.”

That model is ending, and cities need to focus more on affordability and livability, as well as adaptability to new types of housing. Ricci is a proponent of infill development — or rezoning and developing land already within a city’s boundaries — and mixed-use development, “places where you can have retail, residential and office kind of together, working together to create more livable spaces.”

New housing development will be built along Oakdale Road with the northern boundary being Claratina Avenue in Modesto, Calif., on Friday, July 16, 2021. Andy Alfaro [email protected]

‘A political and legal quagmire’

Even with plans for new types of development, those being built right now are facing their own challenges.

In Modesto, both the recession, as well as complicated rules and regulations regarding the drawn-out process of entitlement — annexing and preparing land for development — have come together to create a pipeline issue. Zagaris said this makes the housing crisis in Modesto worse “than in most other parts of the country.”

“In terms of the supply of entitled land, it is a political and legal quagmire we have here that is not going to go away,” he said. “It is so challenging that many folks who own land in what is called the ‘path of growth’ in Modesto … have decided we’re not going to pursue this.”

Jaylen French, Modesto’s economic development director, said that in terms of overhead costs, developing new land is always risky for a city. Since entitled land needs to be fitted with sewer lines, sidewalks and other utilities — which then have to be maintained in perpetuity — embarking on a large-scale development typically results in a “net negative” for a city’s budget.

“You don’t typically see (city) incentives for residential (development),” French said. “What the city would want to do is make the process as streamlined as possible, as easy as possible.”

Zagaris and PMZ are in the process of developing Tivoli, a roughly 454-acre proposed mix of homes, stores, offices, an elementary school and parkland.

The project has been in development for over a decade. When the City Council approved the development in 2008, plans included as many as 3,193 new homes ranging in size from apartments and condominiums to regular houses and small estates.

Twelve years later, Tivoli has yet to break ground.

Zagaris said he expects the project — alongside Village One in Modesto — to be among the last large-scale development projects in the city. He said fellow developers are wary of investing in projects that could take over a decade to complete and that run risks of complications in every step of the process.

Without any significant changes, Zagaris said he doesn’t “think we’re going to solve the imbalance between the needs of the families in the area and the supply, ever.”

For Zagaris, Tivoli will be the last large project in a decades-long career in Modesto. He’s in his 70s now and no longer interested in the prospect of embarking on another 10- or 15-year development process.

“I don’t want to be 95 years old when the next neighborhood happens,” he said.

Is LA Losing The Fight Against Slum Housing?

The more Garcetti and the Democrats throw money at the homeless, the more homeless we have—and the larger the “Homeless Industry” becomes and wealthier.  This is about paying off friends and supporters, not helping those in need.

“Despite citations from the county, the Department of Public Health said Rochel failed to call in for a scheduled compliance review, and that a re-inspection revealed repairs had not been made.

“A referral was made to the district attorney’s office requesting an administrative hearing be held with the owner,” the department said in an email.

The agency added that it has since found problems with other units at the property, and that “a case is being prepared to refer this property to the district attorney and county counsel for enforcement.”

Tenants Caught In A Confusing Web

Supo-Orija, Villegas and other tenants are now suing Rochel, alleging that he has failed to provide habitable living conditions and has violated the county’s rent control laws, along with other counts.

 “Right now, a lawsuit really is one of the only recourses that tenants have,” said Katie McKeon, a staff attorney with Public Counsel who is not involved in this case.

Literally, the city, by NOT enforcing regulations has created slum housing and homelessness.  This isn’t a money problem, it is a failure of government to enforce its rules. 

Is LA Losing The Fight Against Slum Housing?

By  David Wagner, LA1st,  7/26/21   

continues the battle against COVID-19, housing advocates say it’s losing a different war — the fight against slum housing.

During the pandemic, tenants living with roaches, crumbling walls and lack of hot water have struggled to get help from the County Department of Public Health, the same agency responsible for L.A.’s pandemic response.

Even when the department has cited landlords, repairs often don’t happen — and tenants say the county is failing to hold negligent property owners accountable.

These problems aren’t new, but the pandemic has made them harder for tenants to escape, said Oscar Zarate, a community organizer with Strategic Actions for a Just Economy (SAJE), who has been working with tenants living in substandard housing.

“If you’re staying indoors 24/7, or for the majority of the day, and there’s a rampant roach infestation, it’s going to take a toll not only on your physical health, but your mental health,” he said.

Housing advocates are now calling on the county to overhaul its enforcement system, arguing that reforms are long overdue.

We can’t wait until a building collapses to take action.

— Community organizer Oscar Zarate

The pressure comes at a time when many low-income tenants are still reeling from the pandemic. Thousands remain deeply in debt to their landlords, and they’ve struggled to obtain rent relief, raising concerns of mass evictions once pandemic-related protections expire later this year.

With tenants in precarious positions, Zarate said the county needs to do a better job of ensuring housing is safe and habitable.

“We can’t wait until a building collapses to take action,” he said.

‘I Can Never Get Used To That Kind Of Thing’

On a busy stretch of Atlantic Avenue in unincorporated East Compton, a small five-unit apartment complex sits sandwiched between a smoke shop and a waste disposal company.

Charles Supo-Orija and his wife rent a unit in one of the three single-story buildings here. When they first moved in they had no issues, he said, but conditions have been steadily deteriorating.

“You see the hole?” Supo-Orija asked, crouching outside his apartment to point out a crack in an exterior wall. “This can take a snake inside.”

Supo-Orija, a former radio broadcaster from Nigeria, said pests routinely get inside his apartment: roaches, spiders, even lizards.

I’ve never seen roaches in microwaves in my life until this time.

— Tenant Charles Supo-Orija

Supo-Orija said. “I can never get used to that kind of thing.”

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One of his worst encounters happened earlier this month. He was lying in bed, falling asleep, when he sensed a twitch inside his ear.

“I felt something crawling,” he said. “And then I got up. I was trying to hit it out, you know? And it kept going.”

The intruder was a cockroach. Days later, Supo-Orija said it was still stuck in his ear canal.

“Possibly they need to flush my ears,” he said.

‘We Should Be Able To Live With Dignity’

Supo-Orija and other tenants have been complaining about the pests here for a long time. First they went to their landlord, Ramon Rochel. Then they notified the County Department of Public Health.

A county inspector visited one of the units last November and found a long list of problems, including “live cockroaches,” “holes in the wall,” a “bathroom window deteriorating” and “no hot water in the unit.”

The inspector ordered Rochel to address the problems and set a date for a follow-up inspection in December.

But the tenant of that unit, Lourdes Villegas, said eight months later, the problems haven’t been fixed.

“It’s heart-wrenching,” she said. “Because we should be able to live with dignity. It’s in his power.”

Villegas is a mother of two young children. Her daughter, 8, has a form of muscular dystrophy that requires regular in-home medical treatment.

You’re putting tenants in a situation where they will accept really terrible conditions in order to just have that roof over their head.

— Public Counsel attorney Katie McKeon

Villegas said raising her kids in an apartment with so many habitability problems has been stressful — a stress compounded by steep rent hikes in recent years. In late 2018, her rent was $900 per month. By 2020, Rochel had raised it to $1,200.

“He wants me to leave,” Villegas said. “So he’s gonna do whatever it takes for me to leave.”

The Landlord: ‘I Am Acting In Accordance To The Law’

Rochel did not agree to an interview and did not answer specific questions we sent him by email. He did email us back to say, “I am acting in accordance to the law as advised by council.”

He said tenants have caused destruction to their units (tenants dispute this) and have not allowed entry for repairs. Rochel said the tenants are retaliating against him for pursuing evictions, but he did not elaborate on that claim.

Last month, the County Department of Consumer and Business Affairs approved Villegas’ application for a rent adjustment.

The department said the landlord violated the county’s rent control laws by imposing annual increases far above the legal limit of 3%, and ruled last month that Villegas does not have to pay rent until the habitability issued in the apartment are corrected.

I am acting in accordance to the law.

— Landlord Ramon Rochel

Despite citations from the county, the Department of Public Health said Rochel failed to call in for a scheduled compliance review, and that a re-inspection revealed repairs had not been made.

“A referral was made to the district attorney’s office requesting an administrative hearing be held with the owner,” the department said in an email.

The agency added that it has since found problems with other units at the property, and that “a case is being prepared to refer this property to the district attorney and county counsel for enforcement.”

Tenants Caught In A Confusing Web

Supo-Orija, Villegas and other tenants are now suing Rochel, alleging that he has failed to provide habitable living conditions and has violated the county’s rent control laws, along with other counts.

 “Right now, a lawsuit really is one of the only recourses that tenants have,” said Katie McKeon, a staff attorney with Public Counsel who is not involved in this case.

McKeon said the situation in East Compton highlights longstanding problems with the county’s approach to housing code enforcement.

She said it’s often unclear where tenants should turn for help.

“Many tenants don’t even realize that they live in unincorporated L.A. County,” McKeon said. “They have to go to a different agency than their neighbors across the street who may be in L.A. city.”

Even those who know to ask the county for help may be confused about who to call, because the responsibility for ensuring apartments are safe and habitable is split between two different departments: Public Health and Public Works.

The system isn’t set up to deal with these types of issues, especially when they’re this egregious.

— Community organizer Oscar Zarate

Tenant advocates say getting one department to visit a troubled property can result in tenants being told to contact the other department. They may end up waiting months for another inspection.

McKeon said the county doesn’t have many tools for holding negligent landlords accountable. Cases can be forwarded to the district attorney, but they often go unenforced. She said that leaves many tenants in a tough spot.

“We cannot ignore the larger housing situation in L.A. County when we’re talking about this issue,” McKeon said. “We know that tenants — especially the lowest-income tenants — have an extremely difficult time finding housing … You’re putting tenants in a situation where they will accept really terrible conditions in order to just have that roof over their head.”

Housing Advocates Call For An Enforcement Overhaul

SAJE and other tenant organizations are now pushing the county to reform its code enforcement system. They want it centralized in one department. And they want inspectors to go into units routinely, rather than waiting for tenants to complain.

In the worst cases, they say the county should have a program that would withhold rent from landlords until they make repairs, similar to the city of L.A.’s Rent Escrow Account Program.

This is indicative of the need to strengthen the County’s code enforcement system to be more accountable to our residents.

— L.A. County Supervisor Holly Mitchell

SAJE’s Oscar Zarate said the failings of the county’s current approach are obvious when looking at properties such as the one in East Compton.

“The system isn’t set up to deal with these types of issues, especially when they’re this egregious,” he said.

‘No One Should Have To Sacrifice Their Health…To Live In Their Apartment’

County leaders have discussed reforms in the past.

In 2018, when the county passed its rent control law, former Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas put forward a motion asking staff to study how code enforcement could be done more consistently. But those discussions haven’t led to change.

County Supervisor Holly Mitchell, who replaced Ridley-Thomas on the board, told us her office is now working with various departments to address the case in East Compton, which falls within her district.

“No one should have to sacrifice their health, safety or well-being in order to live in their apartment,” Mitchell said in an email. “This is indicative of the need to strengthen the County’s code enforcement system to be more accountable to our residents.”

Meanwhile, tenant Charles Supo-Orijia said even with all the problems at his apartment, he hasn’t missed a month of rent.

“There must be some responsibility that should come with that,” he said. “Making sure that properties are hygienic and safe for habitation — that is the least any responsible property owner can do.”

He’s not sure how long it’ll take to make that a reality in his home.

What questions do you have about business and the economy in Southern California?

David Wagner focuses on Southern Californians getting left behind in an economy beset by soaring unemployment, pandemic-related business closures and high housing costs.

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Lacy: Gov. Newsom has accepted $164,390 in behested legal services in the case challenging the legality of his flawed Death Penalty Moratorium

Gavin Newsom is corrupt.  In small ways and big ways.  Here he is using a private law firm to defend himself from a lawsuit.  Why is he being sued?  Illegally he has stopped the use of the death penalty in California.  Though voters many times have made it clear they want the death penalty, Newsom is a rogue governor.

“According to public disclosures, as of late May, and as of yet unreported by news media, California Governor Gavin Newsom has received more than $164,000 from the law firm of O’Melveny and Myers in bested legal services to defend the legal challenge to his Death Penalty Moratorium, which will be heard in court next week in Sacramento.

Newsom has also received significant free legal services from another major law firm in connection with his Moratorium, including $405,000 in legal services from the private law firm of Boies Schiller Flexner, to help him craft the repeal of rules and other actions establishing his death penalty moratorium, by Executive Order in 2019.”

Why isn’t the media reporting on this?  Just another reason to Recall Newsom—stop corruption in the Governors office.

Governor Newsom has accepted $164,390 in behested legal services in the case challenging the legality of his flawed Death Penalty Moratorium  

James Lacy, attorney, California Political Review,  7/27/21

According to public disclosures, as of late May, and as of yet unreported by news media, California Governor Gavin Newsom has received more than $164,000 from the law firm of O’Melveny and Myers in bested legal services to defend the legal challenge to his Death Penalty Moratorium, which will be heard in court next week in Sacramento.

Newsom has also received significant free legal services from another major law firm in connection with his Moratorium, including $405,000 in legal services from the private law firm of Boies Schiller Flexner, to help him craft the repeal of rules and other actions establishing his death penalty moratorium, by Executive Order in 2019.  Now a lawsuit is pending that challenges the Governor’s powers to repeal those rules and dismantle the death chamber at San Quentin.  While the Los Angeles-based O’Melveny and Myers has represented Newsom pro bono in the legal challenge to that Executive Order, it has also received at least $600,000 in state funds representing the Newsom Administration in other cases.

A hearing on mutual motions for summary adjudication is scheduled in Sacramento Superior Court, Department 53 for August 4 in the case of Lacy v. Newsom, Case. No. 34-2021-00293349-CU-MC-GDS.  The lawsuit seeks a Declaratory Judgment that Newsom unconstitutionally exceeded his authority by disregarding established law in dismantling the death chamber and repealing the state’s lethal injection protocol regulations as part of his death penalty moratorium, and seeks a reversal of those actions.
  Californian’s remain generally supportive of the death penalty law according to the most probative recent polling of the issue.  Early in June, the national polling firm of McLaughlin and Associates found 49% of Californians would vote No if a constitutional amendment to abolish the death penalty is placed on the ballot in 2022 by the Legislature, while 43.8% would vote Yes.  When voters are informed of issues that would be raised during a campaign to repeal the death penalty, opposition to repeal increases to a majority of 53.3% of voters saying No to abolishing California’s death penalty law, and support drops to just 40.5%.  See poll results: https://usjf.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/CA-Statewide-Executive-Summary-6-8-21-1.pdf.
 

 
About James V. Lacy

-Author of Politico Bestseller “Taxifornia”, www.amazon.com/author/james.lacy
-Co-Host, KABC 790AM’s “Live in Taxifornia”, KABC.com
-Managing Partner, Wewer & Lacy Law Firm, www.wewerlacy.com
-Owner, Landslide Communications, www.landslidecommunications.com
-Publisher, California Political Review, www.capoliticalreview.com
-President, United States Justice Foundation, www.usjf.net