San Fran considering congestion tax on high-earning drivers

San Fran is very creative in ways to get rid of tourists, business people and to force the idle class to flee the City.  If the homeless do not get you, the out of control crime will.  Most of the main streets in town are shut down to the use of cars.  So bring your hiking boots if you are meeting people in the Market Street area.

“The authority’s Downtown Congestion Pricing Study team is still weighing different options, but all three of the scenarios currently being considered would charge a $6.50 fee to enter the congested pricing zones during weekday rush hours for folks who make $100,000 or more, with discounts for lower-income individuals, drivers with disabilities, and people who live in the areas impacted. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that commuters making less than $46,000 would not pay a fee at all.

If I wanted to make sure San Fran died—this would be a significant part of the plan.  Make it inconvenient and expensive to live and do business in San Fran. Even people on welfare in San Fran get more than $46,000 a year! 

San Francisco considering congestion tax on high-earning drivers

By BRECK DUMAS, Fox News   7/26/21  

SAN FRANCISCO – The San Francisco County Transportation Authority is once again eyeing a tax on drivers in the busiest parts of the city’s downtown, and has launched a study into a so-called “congestion pricing” plan as traffic begins to pick up following 2020’s pandemic-induced lull.

While the pricing plan is still three to five years from being hammered out and requires the approval of both San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors and California’s legislature, the SFCTA already has an idea of how hard the potential fees might hit commuters and tourists.

The authority’s Downtown Congestion Pricing Study team is still weighing different options, but all three of the scenarios currently being considered would charge a $6.50 fee to enter the congested pricing zones during weekday rush hours for folks who make $100,000 or more, with discounts for lower-income individuals, drivers with disabilities, and people who live in the areas impacted. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that commuters making less than $46,000 would not pay a fee at all.

San Francisco has been mulling the congestion tax for years, and last studied the issue in 2010. Officials decided to launch another study on the prospect in 2019 when the city hit its congestion peak. While congestion all but disappeared in the city after the coronavirus pandemic hit last year, the SFCTA says traffic is picking up again and they want to be ahead of it.

Proponents of the plans argue that beyond cutting down on traffic jams, congestion pricing would also reduce air pollution and cut down on pedestrian fatalities. Critics are concerned about the impact on lower-income residents and commuters, hence SFCTA’s proposal to cut or remove the tax depending on people’s income.

Still, there is skepticism over imposing the tax, especially as San Francisco’s downtown continues to recover and offices sit empty while many workers remain remote.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. Really??? says

    Just one more reason why producers that provide both capital and jobs will leave.

    If they don’t leave it will be because the are another tech type that wants the Socialist State that eventually will kill them…..ironic isn’t it.

  2. Three to five years? The conditions are growing that this may be a moot idea.

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