UC Berkeley Water Report Sinks California Farm Industry Says Valley Assemblyman

While this report in ten months old, the water situation has gotten worse, not better in that time.  Gov. Newsom and the Democrats in Sacramento and D.C. are in the process of rationing water to farms and the cities.  Jobs will be lost, costs to consumers will go up and our exports will go down.

“PERMANENT ECONOMIC IMPACTS UNCOVERED IN THE REPORT INCLUDE:

  • Unemployment in some disadvantaged communities will more than double.
  • Up to 1 million acres of productive farmland will be permanently fallowed in the San Joaquin Valley, representing one-fifth of all acres under cultivation in the Valley.
  • The annual farm revenue loss associated with this fallowing is $7.2 billion per year, or roughly 14 percent of California’s total farm production.
  • Counting indirect and induced job losses together with direct losses, California stands to permanently lose as many as 85,000 full-time jobs and $2.1 billion in employee wages across California. These losses will reach further into the economy as newly unemployed workers have less income to spend on household purchases.

This is not a natural disaster—it is man made—by the Democrats and their refusal to build more dams and have a positive water policy rather than a restrictive, costly one.

UC Berkeley Water Report Sinks California Farm Industry Says Valley Assemblyman

KMJNOW  3/2/20 

FRESNO, CA (KMJ) – A groundbreaking new report released Monday afternoon spells out the economic disaster for farmers in the Central Valley and statewide as a result of California’s water policies.

The report done by University of California, Berkeley, economists Dr. David Sunding and Dr. David Roland-Holst shows that the California economy will suffer unless responsible, balanced water reforms are enacted in the effort to achieve groundwater sustainability goals in the San Joaquin Valley.

Assemblyman Jim Patterson’s Office released the data:

PERMANENT ECONOMIC IMPACTS UNCOVERED IN THE REPORT INCLUDE:

  • Unemployment in some disadvantaged communities will more than double.
  • Up to 1 million acres of productive farmland will be permanently fallowed in the San Joaquin Valley, representing one-fifth of all acres under cultivation in the Valley.
  • The annual farm revenue loss associated with this fallowing is $7.2 billion per year, or roughly 14 percent of California’s total farm production.
  • Counting indirect and induced job losses together with direct losses, California stands to permanently lose as many as 85,000 full-time jobs and $2.1 billion in employee wages across California. These losses will reach further into the economy as newly unemployed workers have less income to spend on household purchases.
  • Tax revenue for local and state government is expected to drop by approximately $535 million per year, based on $242 million in lost city and county tax revenue and $293 million in lost tax revenue at the state level.
  • Despite a demonstrated statewide impact, the areas most impacted by job losses are the state’s most underserved communities already suffering from the lack of quality drinking water.

The report was supported by the “Water Blueprint for the San Joaquin Valley”, a broad coalition of local governments, academic institutions, water users, and others working toward achieving balanced solutions that limit economic, community, and environmental impacts.

The group recognizes the need for cooperation between water stakeholders, including environmental groups and disadvantaged community groups, to develop and advance thoughtful solutions.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. William Hicks says

    The one industry that is far more important than anything else in California is our Agriculture. Destroy it and then get used to not eating.

  2. Richard Wahl says

    I farmed for a number of years – thankfully not in this ridiculous state. Do you suppose that people are dumb enough to actually wait until they go hungry before stopping the madness?

  3. Show you how stupid this is…..

    The City of Santa Barbara is currently negotiating to “SELL” excess water to outside agencies. SB is a classic case of an experience in high density and paving over every inch of urban life.

    Does anyone remember it idiot Weiner who has destroyed most zoning and land use planning at the local level? Does pandering to illegals who cannot afford to live in reasonable housing come to mind?

    Water game is a play to contracting forces on the Left that are making millions while building high rise concret.

Speak Your Mind

*