CalPERS Board Restores $99,000 Pension for CHP Officer Convicted of Molesting Daughters

The CalPERS Board of Administration voted Wednesday to restore the $99,000-per-year pension of a retired California Highway Patrol officer who was convicted of sexually molesting his two daughters. Johnnie Swaim, 56, of Imperial, was convicted of four felonies by a jury in 2013 in Imperial County Superior Court for molesting the two girls when each was under 10 years old. He maintained he was innocent. Swaim was sentenced to 10 years in prison. In 2016, while in corrections department custody, he filed for retirement based on his last day of work for the CHP in 2011, and started receiving a pension, then worth about $93,300 per year.

CalPERS reduced his benefit last year to about $14,000, wiping out service credit for the time he worked after the date of first felony conviction, which CalPERS identified as in 1997. The retirement system cited a state law that prevents public employees who commit felonies in the course of their work from continuing to accrue pensions. Swaim appealed, arguing that his convictions weren’t work-related. An administrative law judge sided with him last month, saying that while his crimes were “despicable,” they weren’t connected to his work as a police officer.

On Wednesday, the board voted without discussion to accept the judge’s ruling and restore Swaim’s pension. With cost-of-living increases that have been applied since 2016, it will be worth about $99,000 per year.

Click here to read the full article in the Sacramento Bee

Increase In CA Vehicle Registration Fee


As reported by Capital Public Radio:

The state will charge Californians more to put their cars on the roads next year as part of the state budget deal reached by Gov. Jerry Brown and Democratic legislative leaders.

The agreement includes a $10 per year increase in the vehicle registration fee that funds the Department of Motor Vehicles and California Highway Patrol. It’s effective April 1, 2017.

The governor proposed the hike in January (see bottom of pg 7 in the link). His Department of Finance says without the increase, the state would need to make “significant budgetary cuts” such as reducing the number of CHP officers on patrol and closing DMV field offices.

The vehicle fee, currently $43, would increase to $53. It would then continue to rise incrementally based on the California Consumer Price Index. …

Click here to read the full article