Criticism of judge in the killing of a Riverside County deputy not so clear, legal experts say

Experts also chide the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Office for lack of a forceful argument against reducing bail for William McKay

It’s every judge’s nightmare: San Bernardino County Superior Court Judge Cara D. Hutson reduced bail for a career criminal awaiting sentencing on a third strike, allowing him to secure his release and then go on to allegedly kill a sheriff’s deputy.

Riverside County Sheriff Chad Bianco lambasted Hutson after the Dec. 29 killing of Deputy Isaiah Cordero and called for the judge to resign. So, too, did Cordero’s mother, Rebecca, receiving thunderous applause at the fallen deputy’s memorial service on Friday.

“Judge Cara Hutson,” she said, “my family is devastated. My son was a good man. My family, Isaiah’s brothers and sisters and his community demand your resignation.”

But an analysis of court documents and interviews with legal experts shows there’s more to the story.

Law experts say Hutson made a legally plausible decision to reduce bail, although probably not a practical one. And they don’t believe  Hutson should surrender her robes. They also found fault with the prosecution in the case.

‘Bad judgment call’

“It’s a bad judgment call, but not legally unreasonable,” said Rudy Loewenstein, a veteran Orange County defense lawyer and a former deputy district attorney.

Suspected gunman William Shae McKay, 44, was killed in a shootout with police after allegedly gunning down Cordero, 32, during a traffic stop in Jurupa Valley. Cordero received a hero’s funeral Friday while the public puzzled over why McKay was not behind bars under California’s “three strikes” law at the time of the shooting.

Acquitted of kidnapping

In November 2021, McKay appeared for a nonjury trial before Hutson, who was appointed to the San Bernardino County Superior Court bench in 2007 by then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. The judge, a Democrat, previously worked as a deputy district attorney from 1994 until her appointment to the newly created seat on the bench. She was unopposed for reelection in 2022.

Hutson found McKay guilty of false imprisonment, making threats likely to result in great bodily injury, evading arrest and receiving stolen property, resulting in a third strike and leaving him susceptible to a sentence of 25 years to life. She acquitted him of two more serious kidnapping charges and reduced his bail accordingly from $950,000 to $500,000 — which McKay told the judge he could not afford.

Asked by Hutson for her input, San Bernardino County Deputy District Attorney Tess Ponce offered this brief opposition: “Your Honor, I think given the change of circumstances and given — just given the stakes I was going to say no bail should be appropriate. I’ll submit to the court.”

McKay ended up making bail pending his sentencing and a motion for a new trial, but he failed to show up in October 2022 for a court date and a warrant was issued for his arrest. Before he failed to appear, McKay was arrested again by Fontana police on a drug charge, but was released after bailing out, authorities confirm. There is no law that would have prohibited McKay from being released on bond again.

$500,000 bail ‘significant’

Legal experts said the $500,000 bail set by Hutson was not inappropriate.

“The judge heard the testimony and adjusted the bail after finding (McKay) not guilty of the most serious charges, and $500,000 is a significant bail,” said Katherine Tinto, director of the criminal justice clinic at the UC Irvine Law School. “According to the transcript, the district attorney did not put up a strong objection to the $500,000 bail.”

Added Tinto: “There’s no indication the judge didn’t do what a judge is supposed to do: evaluate the facts, evaluate the criminal history and consider bail.”

Lawrence Rosenthal, a professor at Chapman University’s Fowler School of Law, also reviewed the transcript of the bail hearing, obtained by the Southern California News Group.

“All we get from the prosecution is a single sentence (opposing bail). There is nothing in the way of a coherent argument there,” said Rosenthal, a former federal prosecutor. “My overall reaction is that the prosecution’s handling of this matter was far from satisfactory. … I don’t think the judge’s handling of this was perfect, but the prosecution should have pushed the judge.”

Jacquelyn Rodriguez, a spokesperson for the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Office, responded: “Regardless of criticism, the bottom line is we objected to the reduction of bail, we asked for no bail.”

Details of the case

According to the records, McKay was accused of kidnapping Lisa Little, an acquaintance who had bailed him out of jail previously and cooked for him occasionally.

In March 2021, Little told San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputies she was asked by McKay to house-sit and feed his dogs while he was in custody on an unrelated case.

The house was burglarized while she was briefly gone and McKay accused her of being involved. Prosecutors alleged McKay punched her in the face, took her purse, keys, credit cards and cellphone, and dragged her to his garage. He also took the car she was driving, which turned out to be stolen.

McKay tied her hands and feet with duct tape, in view of two accomplices, according to the prosecution’s presentencing report. The woman was taken to various parts of the house, while McKay and the others made purchases on her credit cards, records allege.

At times, duct tape was placed over the woman’s mouth and she was punched. She eventually broke free of her restraints and ran to a neighbor’s house, where she called police.

Later that month, the California Highway Patrol tried to pull McKay over for driving a stolen vehicle, but he led officers on a 20-mile pursuit. He and a passenger, Abrianna Valerie Gonzalez, abandoned the car when it became disabled and fled on foot, armed with knives. They were arrested after Gonzalez stabbed a police dog, which had to be airlifted to a hospital, the CHP said at the time.

Victim hands ‘not clean’

After McKay’s trial, the prosecutor disclosed that she had just discovered there was a federal indictment against the victim — allegedly for transporting fentanyl — an indictment that McKay could have used to impeach Little’s testimony. Before rendering her verdict, Hutson acknowledged that Little may not have been entirely credible.

“The Court knows that Ms. Little’s hands are not clean. I’ll just leave it that way. So she’s not an angel to this Court,” Hutson said. “That is going to be considered within the ruling and verdicts that I am going to give.”

Hutson dismissed two counts of kidnapping and kidnapping to commit rape or robbery, saying the victim was not moved a significant distance to qualify for the charges. But Hutson found McKay guilty of the other crimes.

“Here’s the problem which Mr. McKay has reiterated to the Court on more than one occasion. The way he lives his life is not necessarily the way of the legal system,” the judge said. “In this instance, the Court knows beyond a reasonable doubt that Mr. McKay decided to take matters into his own hands and dispense his brand of street justice.”

‘Not going nowhere’

McKay, acting as his own attorney, then asked the judge to reset his bail.

“I’ve learned a valuable lesson in all this. I’m not going nowhere,” McKay pleaded with the judge.

Hutson told McKay that the bail schedule for false imprisonment was $500,000.

“I will not release you (on your own recognizance) because the verdict is in and I have to always be mindful of the fact that you are still looking down the barrel of a life sentence,” Hutson told him. “And so I must keep bail at $500,000 now … because the verdict has changed, circumstances have changed and I have adjusted the bail to those circumstances.”

Hutson knew when she made her ruling that McKay had two prior strikes.

Prior strikes

The first strike was a 1999 felony conviction for assault with a firearm. He was sentenced to three years in state prison. In that crime, McKay was contacted by police during a traffic stop, but quickly accelerated to get away. He led police on a 100-mph chase, driving through a Caltrans work zone and sending crews scattering to get out of the path of his vehicle, records show.

When the car became disabled, McKay fled with a gun in his hand. After initially disobeying orders to drop the gun, McKay finally tossed it aside and surrendered to police, records show.

The second strike was related to a February 2005 attack — while he was still on parole from the first conviction. A couple was in their bed when McKay and an accomplice kicked down their door, turned on the light and began beating them with objects from the room, records state.

Click here to read the full article in the Press Enterprise

McCarthy Elected House speaker in Rowdy Post-Midnight Vote

WASHINGTON —  

Republican Kevin McCarthy was elected House speaker on a historic post-midnight 15th ballot early Saturday, overcoming holdouts from his own ranks and floor tensions that boiled over after a chaotic week that tested the new GOP majority’s ability to govern.

“My father always told me, it’s not how you start, it’s how you finish,” McCarthy told cheering fellow Republicans.

Eager to confront President Joe Biden and the Democrats, he promised subpoenas and investigations. “Now the hard work begins,” the California Republican declared. He credited former President Donald Trump for standing with him and for making late calls “helping get those final votes.”

Republicans roared in celebration when his victory was announced, chanting “USA! USA!”

Finally elected, McCarthy took the oath of office, and the House was finally able to swear in newly elected lawmakers who had been waiting all week for the chamber to formally open and the 2023-24 session to begin.

After four days of grueling ballots, McCarthy flipped more than a dozen conservative holdouts to become supporters, including the chairman of the chamber’s Freedom Caucus.

He fell one vote short on the 14th ballot, and the chamber became raucous, unruly.

McCarthy strode to the back of the chamber to confront Republican Matt Gaetz, sitting with Lauren Boebert and other holdouts. Fingers were pointed, words exchanged and violence apparently just averted.

At one point, Republican Mike Rogers of Alabama, shouting, approached Gaetz before another Republican, Richard Hudson of North Carolina, physically pulled him back.

“Stay civil!” someone shouted.

Order restored, the Republicans fell in line to give McCarthy the post he had fought so hard to gain, House speaker, second in the line of succession to the presidency.

The few remaining Republican holdouts began voting present, dropping the tally he needed. It was the end of a bitter standoff that had shown the strengths and fragility of American democracy.

The tally was 216-212 with Democrats voting for leader Hakeem Jeffries, and six Republican holdouts to McCarthy simply voting present.

The night’s stunning turn of events came after McCarthy agreed to many of the detractors’ demands — including the reinstatement of a longstanding House rule that would allow any single member to call a vote to oust him from office.

Even as McCarthy secured the votes he needs, he will emerge as a weakened speaker, having given away some powers and constantly under the threat of being booted by his detractors.

But he could also be emboldened as a survivor of one of the more brutal fights for the gavel in U.S. history. Not since the Civil War era has a speaker’s vote dragged through so many rounds of voting.

The showdown that has stymied the new Congress came against the backdrop of the second anniversary of the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol, which shook the country when a mob of Trump’s supporters tried to stop Congress from certifying the Republican’s 2020 election defeat to Biden.

At a Capitol event Friday, some lawmakers, all but one of them Democrats, observed a moment of silence and praised officers who helped protect Congress on that day. And at the White House, Biden handed out medals to officers and others who fought the attackers.

“America is a land of laws, not chaos,” he said.

At the afternoon speaker’s vote, a number of Republicans tiring of the spectacle temporarily walked out when one of McCarthy’s most ardent challengers, Gaetz, railed against the GOP leader.

Contours of a deal with conservative holdouts who had been blocking McCarthy’s rise had emerged the night before, and took hold after four dismal days and 14 failed votes in an intraparty standoff unseen in modern times.

One significant former holdout — Republican Scott Perry, chairman of the conservative Freedom Caucus, who had been a leader of Trump’s efforts to challenge the 2020 election — tweeted after his switched vote for McCarthy, “We’re at a turning point.”

Trump may have played a role in swaying some holdouts — calling into a meeting of Republican freshmen the night before, and calling other members ahead of voting. He had urged Republicans to wrap up their public dispute.

As Republican Mike Garcia of California nominated McCarthy on an earlier ballot Friday, he also thanked the U.S. Capitol Police, who were given a standing ovation for protecting lawmakers and the legislative seat of democracy on Jan. 6, 2021.

But in nominating the Democratic leader Jeffries, Democrat Jim Clyburn of South Carolina recalled the horror of that day. “The eyes of the country are on us today,” he told his colleagues.

Electing a speaker is normally an easy, joyous task for a party that has just won majority control. But not this time: About 200 Republicans were stymied by 20 far-right colleagues who said McCarthy was not conservative enough. Only the 12th ballot on Friday afternoon did McCarthy start making gains, flipping their votes to support.

The House adjourned Friday until late in the night, giving time for last-minute negotiations and allowing two absent Republican colleagues to return to Washington.

The disorganized start to the new Congress pointed to difficulties ahead with Republicans now in control of the House, much the way that some past Republican speakers, including John Boehner, had trouble leading a rebellious right flank. The result: government shutdowns, standoffs and Boehner’s early retirement when conservatives threatened to oust him.

The agreement McCarthy presented to the holdouts from the Freedom Caucus and others centers around rules changes they have been seeking for months. Those changes would shrink the power of the speaker’s office and give rank-and-file lawmakers more influence in drafting and passing legislation.

At the core of the emerging deal was the reinstatement of a House rule that would allow a single lawmaker to make a motion to “vacate the chair,” essentially calling a vote to oust the speaker. McCarthy had resisted allowing a return to the longstanding rule that former Speaker Nancy Pelosi had done away with, because it had been held over the head of Boehner. But it appears McCarthy had no other choice.

Click here to read the full article in the San Diego Union Tribune

The California Legislature is Back: Five Key Questions

A soaring homeless population. A bitter battle with the oil industry over gasoline prices. A spending plan for a state with the world’s fifth-largest economy as threats of a recession hover.

There’s a lot for the California Legislature to deal with this year — and it made little headway Wednesday, its first day back at the Capitol since swearing-in a new class of members last month. The brief floor sessions in the state Senate and Assembly focused more on the dearly departed than the challenges ahead.

The slow start to the legislative session is nothing new, but it does leave plenty of time for reflection. Here are some key questions for the year to come:

What will be the Legislature’s priorities? 

By the afternoon, Senate and Assembly staff reported that just two new measures had been introduced in each house. (More than 140 were already submitted last month.) With a bill introduction deadline of Feb. 17, committee hearings and votes for most proposals are still months away.

So until then, floor sessions are mostly an opportunity for lawmakers to check in — and receive their per diem, the supplemental $214 paid daily to legislators for housing and living expenses, as long as they don’t leave Sacramento more than three days at a time.

The first floor sessions on Wednesday, for example, lasted about a half hour each in the Senate and Assembly, largely taken up by speeches memorializing friends and family who had died. Assemblymember Greg Wallis, a Bermuda Dunes Republican who won his seat by 85 votes, made his inaugural appearance on the floor; his race had not yet been called in time for the ceremonial swearing-in on Dec. 5.

In an interview, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon said housing issues would remain a central focus for the Legislature this session, including accountability for the billions of the dollars that California has spent on homelessness and development programs in recent years.

“Housing is the 10,000-pound gorilla that won’t go away,” the Lakewood Democrat said.

Rendon said he would also like to build on the momentum of a sweeping package of legislation passed last year to address climate change by tackling how transportation, the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in California, contributes to the problem.

“Climate change is something we’ve been a leader on as a state,” he said. “We have to make sure we don’t fall behind again.”

How much impact will the budget deficit have?

Looming over the Legislature’s plans this year is the possibility of an economic downturn. Its fiscal and policy advisory office estimates a $24 billion budget deficit, and Gov. Gavin Newsom, who is set to unveil his preliminary spending plan next week, has also been urging caution for months.

Legislative leaders are projecting optimism about California’s ability to weather any revenue shortfalls, pointing to the tens of billions of dollars that now sit in state reserves. Sen. Nancy Skinner, a Berkeley Democrat who leads the Senate budget committee, said that while it may not be the time to create any more new programs, California’s finances are sound.

“With the type of surplus we had last year,” nearly $50 billion that was mostly directed to one-time expenditures over the next several years, Skinner said, “we have the space right now to make some adjustments to those if necessary.”

But if the economic picture grows gloomier in the months ahead, lawmakers may be forced to downsize their boldest policy ideas.

Sen. Susan Eggman, a Stockton Democrat, said this session was the right time to step back and examine whether new programs that the state has launched in recent years are working as intended.

“This session should be about a lot of oversight,” she said. “We still have ambitious packages, but we’re all very conscious of the price tags.”

What about the oil special session?

While Newsom continues to go after the oil industry — his office published a press release last week highlighting “Big Oil’s top lies” — there have been no significant developments on his “price gouging penalty” proposal since it was formally introduced a month ago.

The details of the penalty that Newsom wants to impose on oil companies for excessive profits, not to mention the special session in which the measure is being considered, remain elusive. But Rendon said the Legislature still plans to take up the issue, even as gas prices fall, likely earlier in the year when there is more time to focus on it.

“Regardless of what happens with gas prices, it’s a good opportunity to ask the questions that we’ve been wanting to ask for a while of oil companies,” he said. “Their profits are staggering.”

How will diverse Legislature affect policy?  

Having the most diverse Legislature in history doesn’t mean much without that representation translating into policy.

Some new lawmakers are already making attempts to do that. 

Assemblymember Jasmeet Bains, a doctor and Democrat from Bakersfield, has introduced a bill that she says represents the concerns of her district: a task force to address fentanyl addiction in the Central Valley. That involves ensuring access to healthcare, addiction and rehabilitation services — and getting fentanyl off the streets, she said. 

“I think the biggest reality that we see up in here in Sacramento is a failure of the Legislature to actively control our drug problem, our drug crisis,” she said. “In California, I don’t think very many people understand how bad the problem is, with exposure to things like fentanyl on the streets.”

Assemblymember Corey Jackson, the first openly gay Black legislator, said his top priorities include addressing mental health and continuing to learn lessons from the pandemic, such as the importance of childcare. The Democrat from the Riverside area introduced a bill to create an Affordable California Commission, tasked with tackling the state’s high cost of living. 

“I come from a working class community. The 60th Assembly District are people who are just trying to survive every day,” he said. “And I wanted to send the message: ‘It is not okay just to survive. You deserve to thrive.’”   

Jackson also plans to tackle what he expects will be a rise in racism and xenophobia ahead of the 2024 election. 

“I intend to take an active role in rooting out racism, even in the very structures and even in the chambers of the state legislature itself,” he said. “Stay tuned, because there’s going to be a whole legislative package on anti-racism and systemic racism.”

Like Jackson, new state Sen. Caroline Menjivar also plans to address mental health. She has introduced a bill to prioritize more full-time counselors to Cal State campuses who can help the diverse student populations

Public transportation and infrastructure are other key areas for her. She notes that in her San Fernando area district, it floods frequently — and typically in the areas where people of color live. 

“A lot of what I speak to comes from lived experiences,” Menjivar said. “You know, when we talk about the lack of affordable housing, it’s my mom who has been on a waiting list for over five years, right. So these are issues that are personal to me.”

What’s happening with the recount?

While the November elections are largely a wrap, one seat remains contested: Democratic Sen. Melissa Hurtado’s Central Valley seat in District 16.

It was a close vote — the second closest legislative contest (based on percentages) in California history, said Alex Vassar, communications manager for the California State Library. 

Hurtado, the incumbent, was sworn into office on Dec. 10 after eking out a 20-vote victory. Republican David Shepard formally requested a recount on Dec. 13. 

That involves recounting ballots from Fresno, Kern, Kings and Tulare counties. Initial results from Fresno, Kern and Tulare counties showed Hurtado holding on to her seat: Shepard gained just two votes in Fresno County, two in Kings and three in Tulare.

After Shepard’s campaign requested a recount in about 20% of Kern County, Hurtado has now asked for a recount of some remaining portions. While a recount can be requested for just part of a county, a second recount can’t be requested for the same portions. 

If Shepard were to pull off a win, though, it wouldn’t change anything Hurtado has done since being sworn in, Vassar said.

“She is a fully active seated member. All of her votes are being cast as a member,” he said. “Just like if someone were to resign — everything they’ve done still stands.” 

Click here to read the full article in CalMatters

Southern California Braces for Heavy Rain as 2023 Continues Its Showery Start

After a New Year’s Eve storm, Southern California will continue its rainy start to 2023 with a storm beginning Thursday, Jan. 5, the National Weather Service said.

Related: Southern California storm map lets you track where the rain is now

After drizzling and light showers were seen Wednesday, NWS meteorologist Brian Adams said Orange County and the Inland Empire will see the heaviest rains starting from about 6 a.m. Thursday and continuing until around 4 p.m. that afternoon. A total of 1-2 inches of rain will be falling uniformly across the populated parts of Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, Adams said. Los Angeles County will see heavy rainfall in a similar window starting at 4 a.m., according to NWS meteorologist Carol Smith.

The storm comes as Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency across California and as the Bay Area braced for a potentially deadly storm that touched down Wednesday. Also Wednesday, evacuations were ordered for those living in the burn scar areas of three recent wildfires in Santa Barbara County, where heavy rain was expected overnight, and could cause widespread flooding and unleash debris flows in several areas.

Higher elevations in Orange County, such as communities in the mountain foothills like Portola Hills and Silverado, may have around 3 inches of total rain, Adams added.

Heavy rain is possible in Inland Empire mountain communities, with snow also expected in the San Bernardino County Mountains above 7,000 feet.

In the Los Angeles metro area, Smith said a total of 1-3 inches were expected. She forecasted that San Fernando Valley would see a total of about 2.5-4 inches of rain Thursday, with heavier showers in the valley’s foothill communities. Long Beach and the South Bay would likely see up to 2 inches of rain, Smith added.

Adams said the Dec. 31 storm has heavily saturated the ground, meaning Southern California’s terrain will likely be less equipped to absorb the incoming rainfall, Adams said.

“The area will be steadily accumulating a large amount of rainfall rather than it falling all at once,” Adams said.

Another NWS meteorologist, Dan Gregoria, said Orange County and the Inland Empire were both issued flood watches due to a risk of flash flooding during the “moderate impact” storm.

Geographically, all of Orange County was at “higher risk” for flash flooding, Gregoria explained. In the Inland Empire, Chino and Ontario were also at risk, he said.

“We do have some concern for (flash flooding),” Gregoria said, noting that drivers should exercise caution during the storm. “We advise to not drive through flooded roadways … it can be really life-threatening and dangerous.”

Los Angeles county could also face flash-flooding, NWS meteorologist Joe Sirard said, adding that burn scar areas were of “most concern.” Free sandbags were available for pick-up in locations across Los Angeles County.

Minimal to no vegetation in the burn scars add to the potential for mud and debris flows, Sirard explained. These flows can even be deadly.

Los Angeles County issued an evacuation warning for the Lake Hughes and King Canyon area, north of Santa Clarita, for this reason. The city of Duarte also put out an advisory for the Fish fire burn scar area, from a 2016 blaze, until Friday morning.

In the Inland Empire, at-risk burn scars include the Fairview fire burn scar that was left behind from a September blaze and the Apple-El Dorado burn scar.

Click here to read the full article in the OC Register

Why Are Some Republicans Revolting Against Kevin McCarthy’s Bid To Be Speaker of the House?

The insurgent Republicans want to balance the budget, impose new barriers to immigration, and increase transparency for future earmark spending.

For the first time in 100 years, no one was elected speaker of the House on the first ballot when the new session of Congress opened on Tuesday—thanks to a breakaway faction of Republicans who denied Rep. Kevin McCarthy’s (R–Calif.) bid to return to the top post in the House of Representatives.

McCarthy finished second to Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D–N.Y.) in the first round of voting, but neither candidate reached the magic number of 218 needed to win a majority. Rep. Andy Biggs (R–Ariz.) received 10 votes on the first ballot, while Rep. Jim Jordan (R–Ohio) picked up six votes and three other lawmakers got one vote each. In all, 19 Republicans voted against McCarthy, who can afford to lose just four votes and maintain a majority of the closely divided chamber.

In a second round of balloting, Jeffries got 212 votes while McCarthy received 203, and Jordan consolidated the 19 Republican votes against McCarthy.

But why, you might be wondering, would a group of Republicans trigger this sort of chaos?

On Tuesday morning, Rep. Scott Perry (R–Penn.), one of the renegade Republicans, laid out the answer to that question in a lengthy statement posted to his Twitter account. Perry said that the group of Republicans opposed to McCarthy was seeking “firm commitments” from McCarthy on four “concrete policies” they wished to bring to a vote.

Those policies, according to Perry: A balanced budget, passage of the Fair Tax Act (which would replace the federal income, payroll, and estate taxes with a national sales tax), passage of a proposal crafted by Texas Republicans that aims to crack down on illegal immigration, and the imposition of term limits for members of Congress.

Additionally, Perry said that McCarthy was asked to support two changes to how the House operates. First, to require a two-thirds vote to approve earmarks, which would have to be voted on individually. Second, to allow amendments that would cut spending to be introduced on the House floor to any legislation.

As a set of proposals, it’s a bit of a mixed bag—though the immigration element would be a massively expensive attempt to limit the free movement of people. It’s also a bit crazy that lawmakers have to resort to once-in-a-century tactics just to get congressional leaders to consider balancing the budget.

But it is certainly not a radical or wildly irresponsible list of demands. More transparency and accountability on earmarks—something that hasn’t really materialized despite the promises of those who pushed to end the earmark ban—would certainly be welcome. Floor amendments to legislation would be a step toward restoring the so-called “regular order” of moving legislation through Congress, another welcome and overdue reform.

In that same Tuesday morning statement, Perry said McCarthy effectively forfeited his chance to be speaker by refusing to go along with those requests. Later on Tuesday, Perry and his fellow breakaway Republicans followed through with that threat.

What happens now? It’s unclear. There will be a third vote in the House, and perhaps many more. In 1855, it took 133 ballots before a stalemate for speaker of the House was broken.

“We are going to continue to vote until Kevin’s the next speaker,” Rep. Dave Joyce (R–Ohio), a McCarthy supporter, told CNN after the second round of balloting on Tuesday.

It might look chaotic and weird, but actually, this is just fine. It’s democracy. For the moment, and maybe longer, think of the House of Representatives as functioning more like a multi-party democracy than the two-party duopoly that we’re used to seeing.

In multiparty systems, two or more parties have to come together and form a coalition in order to achieve a governing majority. That requires some horse-trading and usually involves drawing up a semiformal document outlining what policies the coalition will work together to craft (and sometimes, equally importantly, which policies will be off-the-table).

For the purposes of the speaker election, Perry and his fellow renegade Republicans are operating like a minority party in a multiparty system: offering their support in exchange for getting to put a hand on the steering wheel of the future coalition government. If McCarthy doesn’t want to make a deal with them, he might have to seek a coalition government with a centrist faction of Democrats. Failing that, Republicans might try to find someone else within their ranks who can get the requisite 218 votes from the chamber.

Click here to read the full article at Reason.com

California is Now A ‘Refuge for Trans Kids’

California already an ‘abortion sanctuary state,’ will now be a ‘transgender state of refuge’

State Sen. Scott Wiener celebrated passage of his bill, SB 107, in August, which just became law January 1st, and now erodes parents’ rights by allowing minor children to travel to California for trans procedures, puberty blockers, known as “gender-affirming health care.”

SB 107 allows non-parent adults to bring minor children to California for experimental and damaging transgender medical interventions, without the knowledge or consent of their parents.

SB 107 now makes California a destination state for “transgender” procedures for minors.

Sen. Wiener claimed that “this is an accepted medical practice,” to the Assembly Appropriations Committee in August. He described the “accepted medical practice” as “Parents allowing their children to have health care.”

A lawyer/mother testified in August that SB 107 is unconstitutional and violates parental rights by offering protections to non-custodial parents to abscond to California for trans gender treatments. “Every Attorney General in the country should be filing lawsuits against California for sterilizing or experimenting on minors,” she said.

The Protect Child Health Coalition warned:

“SB107 would create a series of unprecedented and dangerous exceptions to California law and customary practice regarding cooperation with other states’ legal proceedings. For example, it would forbid the release of medical information, even in a civil or criminal proceeding and even in response to a valid subpoena.”

“Even more shocking is what the law says about parental custody determinations. It would actually authorize parental kidnapping (when a non-custodial parent illegally takes a child from the parent who has legal custody) if the purpose of the kidnapping is to subject the child to radical gender transition procedures.

Never addressed were the “de-transitioner” warnings and experiences of trauma, regret, and often normal issues of confused teenagers. The New York Post did an in-depth report on this important aspect of regret, in which they identified many young people seeking to transition, but are doing so without a proper mental-health evaluation.

“According to an online survey of detransitioners conducted by Dr. Lisa Littman last year, 40% said their gender dysphoria was caused by a mental-health condition and 62% felt medical professionals did not investigate whether trauma was a factor in their transition decisions,” the Post reported.

“I saw children being fast-tracked onto medical solutions for psychological problems, and when kids get on the medical conveyor belt, they don’t get off,” Marcus Evans said. He was the Clinical Director of Adult and Adolescent Services at the Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust, a publicly funded mental-health center in the UK where many youth seek treatment for gender dysphoria, the Post reported. “But the politicization of the issue was shutting down proper clinical rigor. That meant quite vulnerable kids were in danger of being put on a medical path for treatment that they may well regret.”

This bill was rammed through California legislative committees by the state’s Democrats, and signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom ignoring any real “transition” data or real life accounts.

Click here to read the full article the full article in the California Globe

Do You Want Fries With That Shakedown?

California’s government has outdone itself with AB 257, a controversial sop to unions that will hurt the poor and raise prices in the fast-food industry.

There’s a joke circulating in California that goes like this: What’s the difference between the Titanic and the state of California? Answer: The Titanic went down with its lights on.

You don’t have to live here to get the dark humor, though it helps. Governor Gavin Newsom led the effort to eliminate oil drilling and ban the sale of new gas-powered vehicles beginning in 2035 — and simultaneously begged us not to run the AC or charge electric vehicles during California’s annual sizzling farewell to summer.

So, few of us were surprised when, on Labor Day 2022, the governor signed Assembly Bill 257, which promises to rescue the poor but will in fact immiserate them. The law was set to go into effect today but has been put on hold by a judge, for now.

Called the FAST Recovery Act, the new law will do for unions what decades of organizing could not accomplish in the dynamic fast-food business. It neatly eliminates the hard work of organizing unwilling workers by declaring them wards of a state commission comprising 13 political appointees who will govern work and wages in California’s fast-food businesses.

In California, political appointees like those proposed in AB 257 are manufactured by the legislature’s Democratic supermajority. That veto-proof majority, in turn, is curated by union leaders — people who raise in excess of $1 billion annually through union dues and spend much of that cash to finance the campaigns of candidates who, once in office, return the favor by doing what the unions tell them to do — things like passage of AB 257.

The smart money says California’s elected officials will hustle to appoint union-friendly commissioners who will quickly impose on fast-food operators a $23 hourly wage, more costly benefits, and molecular regulation of work rules.

In an industry that operates on razor-thin margins, this will have two immediate predictable outcomes. On the worker side, higher wages, richer benefits, and more cumbersome labor laws will lead to job cuts as franchise operators seek to curb their skyrocketing labor costs. In some places, restaurant owners will rapidly automate; ATM-like ordering kiosks will replace actual people — primarily immigrants and other minority people who, by way of the fast-food business model, are just beginning their ascent on the American economic ladder. Other business owners may simply sell off to larger enterprises whose high volumes will allow them to cope with slimmer margins. That will make it harder for workers to rise into positions of management and ownership.

On the customer side, as some franchisees simply close permanently, we’ll see the expansion of what progressives have called “food deserts” in poor communities already underserved by grocery chains. Customer service in the remaining stores will decline and prices will rise.

So, in a kind of grim partnership, poor customers and rising workers, immigrants and the native-born, will suffer together. This is the iron law of California progressivism: Claim that new laws will help the poor. When the actual effect turns out to be catastrophic for the poor, blame capitalism/markets/billionaires/racism, and expand government control of the business. Rinse, repeat, and promote as a national — even global — model for equity. And if Californians have anything to say about it, AB 257 will be coming to you, no matter where you live in the United States.

The most eye-popping criticism of AB 257 came from California’s own Department of Finance. In June, the department recommended that legislators vote against the bill. Its analysis concludes with language that can be applied to much of California’s regulatory empire, and is worth quoting in its entirety:

Finance is opposed to this bill because it creates significant ongoing costs at DIR [the state Department of Industrial Relations]. Additionally, it creates a sector-specific rule-making body within DIR, which could lead to a fragmented regulatory and legal environment for employers and raise long-term costs across industries. Finally, it is not clear that this bill will accomplish its goal, as it attempts to address delayed enforcement by creating stricter standards for certain sectors, which could exacerbate existing delays.

“Not clear”? In California, it’s absolutely clear that AB 257 — now law — will not accomplish its goal.

Where is such a bad idea conceived? Partly in academia, where professors celebrate as progress the imposition of a failing European model of government–labor–business “cooperation.” Writing in Fortune, Thomas Kochan exulted that, with AB 257, “California has a unique opportunity to launch a path-breaking high-road business and employment strategy for owners and workers in its fast food industry.” He hopes that its success will spread “across the nation.”

(Note to Dr. Kochan: You’re professor emeritus at MIT’s much-honored Sloan School of Management. I just live and work in California. But please, never, ever use any form of the infinitive “to break” and “California” in the same sentence. It’s what people in your school’s psych department call a Freudian slip.)

In California, the engine running AB 257 is organized labor, particularly the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) and its national “Fight for $15” activist wing.

SEIU has struggled lately. In part that’s because the Supreme Court’s 2018 decision in Janus v. AFSCME made government-union membership voluntary. Nearly 30 percent of government workers eligible to join SEIU and other unions have responded by hitting the eject button. The hundreds of dollars those workers save on annual union dues means lost revenue to the unions hoping to represent them. (Disclosure: California Policy Center, where I am president, has played a leading role in helping workers leave their unions.)

That rush to the union’s exits has created a cash crisis at SEIU. The union responded by pushing AB 257 with the expectation that the Fast Food Council will move rapidly to recommend universal membership in SEIU as the only solution to low pay and dangerous work conditions.

About those work conditions: Many media reports banging the drum for AB 257 relied on a UCLA Labor Center study that claimed to discover that working at your favorite burger joint is like cobalt mining. Vox cited UCLA’s finding that “43 percent of workers experienced workplace injury or illness, nearly half experienced verbal abuse, and a quarter said they were retaliated against by their managers for reporting workplace issues.” So did the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco ChronicleCalMatters, and the Sacramento Bee.

Reporters were so eager to amplify a story about industrial “wage theft,” “workplace injuries,” and medieval exploitation that none took the time to examine UCLA’s study. In fact, recently published internal UCLA documents reveal that “the study was part of a larger advocacy strategy by the SEIU and its Fight for $15 campaign.” Specifically, the documents show that UCLA’s “independent” researchers outsourced the labor of recruiting and surveying fast-food workers to SEIU. When the study was released, enthusiastic reporters asked to interview the aggrieved workers. Then, UCLA’s documents show, “those labor groups even took efforts to obscure” the snuggly relationship between researchers and union activists.

You might be tempted to say that because the UCLA study was junk — corrupt, in fact — we may never know how truly grim things are in the fast-food business. But we do know: You are in fact safer working in a fast-food restaurant than in most other industries.

Newsom’s signature on AB 257 was still wet when SEIU unleashed its national media campaign promoting the California law as the solution to labor problems everywhere. “This is LANDMARK labor legislation that presents a way forward for fast food workers in this country,” SEIU said over and over. Using the hashtags #UnionsForAll and #AB257, union activists in TexasFloridaMissouri, and beyond posted photos of workers spontaneously celebrating California’s win as their own. Were they moved by the spirit of international labor, roused by their own personal experience? They were not. Their messages were crafted and amplified by one of California’s largest unions.

Let’s summarize: AB 257 will likely kill the jobs of immigrant and poor men and women who want to work in the fast-food industry — because this work, however difficult, is better than the alternatives. It imposes what union organizers could not achieve through voluntary association. It will raise food prices and limit food options in already struggling neighborhoods. It is opposed by the very regulatory body that is supposed to supervise its implementation. Its passage relied in part on a corrupt “study” by a major state university working with the union that will benefit from the new law.

It’s now likely that AB 257 will be opposed at the ballot box. As soon as Newsom signed the bill, an association representing fast-food businesses began gathering signatures for a statewide ballot proposition to repeal it. On December 9, the California secretary of state’s office declared that the association had submitted more than the minimum number of signatures to qualify the measure for the November 2024 ballot. Under California law, that should have postponed implementation of AB 257. Instead, the state’s Department of Industrial Relations announced it would dispense with a century of case law and impose the law on January 1. On December 29, the association announced it will sue the state to uphold its own laws. One day later, on December 30, a state judge cut the baby in half: The state can begin considering appointments to the commission, but it can’t change wages or work rules.

Click here to read the full article in the National Review

2022, The Year of Diversions: Gov. Newsom Clings to Covid Powers, Climate Lies, and More

CA Globe headlines tell what really happened in 2022

Instead of an overview of the year that was 2022, I thought I’d re-post important California Globe headlines and the links to the articles.

These story headlines tell us all what really happened in 2022 in California – politics, spending, the mandates and regulations, and constitutional abuses. Notably, Governor Gavin Newsom even vetoed a bill to limit his Covid emergency powers which he first declared in March 2020; Newsom maintains emergency powers more than 1,000 days, and nearly 3 years later.

Sir Winston Churchill warned us, “evils can be created much quicker than they can be cured.” He must have been anticipating the California Governor and elected members of the Legislature in 2022 when he said, “To build may have to be the slow and laborious task of years. To destroy can be the thoughtless act of a single day.”

We strive every day to bring you the truth as we obsessively chronicle everything political throughout the state of California. Click on any headline for the article. And please, share your thoughts in the comments section.

Let’s move on to the Globe headlines of 2022:

Newsom’s Latest Criminal Pardons of 10 More Makes 140 Total Since 2019

Alameda County Board of Supervisors Vote 4-0 To Ban Criminal Background Checks For Housing

Ceaseless CA Dept. of Public Health Commercials Push Covid Boosters, Testing, Masking Up

Homeless Advocates Attempt To Halt San Francisco Encampment Removals By Emergency Order

Oakland City Council Reinstates Indoor Public Masking Mandate

California Reparations Plan is Rooted in Stupidity and Historical Lies

LA Motel Owners Fight Back Against Mayor Bass’ Homeless Housing Plans

Biden Isn’t Fighting to Preserve Title 42, He’s Fighting to Preserve the Power of the CDC

Doctors Without Ethical Borders

Senator Weiner Reintroduces Psychedelic Drug Decriminalization bill

Politics and Public Health Agencies Behind Latest Round of Covid Hysteria

Judge Blocks Major Part of California Gun Control Bill

New Report: University Policies Fail to Protect Jewish Students from Antisemitism

Lancaster City Council Declares State Of Emergency Over LA Mayor Karen Bass Homeless Plans

Lawsuit Filed to Halt Removal of Northern CA Klamath River Hydroelectric Dams

Los Angeles City Council Meeting Falls Into Chaos Following Brief Entrance of Kevin De Leon

Gov. Newsom Blames GOP, Biden Administration For Current Migrant Crisis During Visit To Border

California’s Homeless Hustle is a House of Cards

Assemblyman Fong Brings Back Bill to Suspend Gas Taxes for One Year

California High Speed Rail: Low Speed Fail

Control vs. Science: California Govt. Medical Tyrants Agitating for Mask Mandates

California Was Just Named One Of The Worst Judicial Hellholes In The Nation – Again

Details Of The Legislative Staff Unionization Legislation

Businesses Across California Brace For Minimum Wage Increase January 1

Will Gov. Newsom’s ‘Sweeping’ Climate Change Legislation Save the Planet?

While California Burns, Politicians Fiddle: One Rancher’s Story

New LA Ordinance Requires Retail Workers Get Work Schedules Two Weeks In Advance

CA GOP Candidate Josh Hoover Defeats Assemblyman Ken Cooley in Assembly 7th District Election

Newsom Vows No White House Run in 2024… Sort Of

California’s EDD Continues to Borrow Hundreds of Millions – about $13 million PER DAY – To Meet its Obligations

Politicians and Media are Trying to Foist Another Covid Winter on America

California Appellate Court Panel Strikes Down SDUSD Appeal Of Vaccine Mandate Ban

Kevin Kiley Wins CA 3rd District House Race Against Kermit Jones

Totality of California’s Proposed COVID Laws Would be Most Aggressive In the Nation

Tehama County Sheriff’s Department To Cut All Daytime Patrols

Gov. Newsom Relying on Politics and Deceit over CA’s High Gas Prices

57.7 % – That’s How Many Californians Officially Don’t Care

Californians Vote for Inflation, More Crime, Water Shortages, High Gas Prices, and Abortion

National Democratic Leadership Denounces Gov. Newsom Over ‘Getting Crushed On Narrative’ Remark

California’s Blue City Crime Wave is On the Ballot

California Lost Double The Number Of Companies In 2021 Than Previous Year New Report Finds

Californians Inundated with Mask and Vax ads by CA Dept. of Public Health

California, 4th Largest Economy in the World, Ranks Among 10 Worst in US for High Taxes

Gov. Newsom’s Blatant Dishonesty on California Public School Test Scores

Snap Becomes Latest Company to Leave San Francisco Amid Office Pullout in City

California Hogs and Chickens Enjoy More Protections Than Unborn Babies

Sen. Scott Wiener Invites Us to Pumpkin Carving Drag Queen Event

Lawsuit Filed to Halt ‘Cancel-Culturalists’ Name Change of UC Hastings College of the Law

Nury Martinez Resigns As LA City Council President Following Audio of Racist Comments

California Pastor Chastises Gov. Newsom for Bible Verse on Abortion Billboards

CA Sen. Shannon Grove Schools Gov. Newsom on Democrats’ High Gas/Oil Costs

Unemployment Fraud Climbs to $32 Billion with No Accountability in Sight

San Francisco Office Occupancy Still Under 40% Despite Ending Mask Mandate

Gov. Newsom Signs AB 2693: Employer Mandatory COVID Reporting

Gov. Newsom Allocates $200M for Abortion Travel & Care, Legalizes Infanticide

Newsom Vetoes Bill To Prohibit Foreign Governments From Buying CA Agricultural Land

Gov. Newsom Vetoes Bill to Limit his Emergency Powers

California Physician Issues Warning About Bill to Punish Physicians for ‘Unprofessional Conduct

Gap Announces Mass Layoffs in SF, NY Corporate Offices

Will Gov. Newsom’s ‘Sweeping’ Climate Change Legislation Save the Planet?

CPUC Passes New Policy Ending All New Gasline Subsidies In Favor of All-Electric Homes

Gov. Newsom Calls on DOJ to Charge Florida and Texas Govs with ‘Kidnapping’ for Shipping Immigrants Out of State

Newsom Places Ads For New California Abortion Website in Seven Red States

CA Teachers Union Did Oppo Research on Parents Who Wanted Schools to Reopen During COVID

Entire SLO County DAs Office Recused from 2020 Black Lives Matter Protest Arrest Case

Sacramento Drug-Addicted Transients Taking Over Neighborhoods While City Fiddles

4 Million Residents in LA County Facing Outdoor Watering Ban until September 20th

Gov. Newsom Signs Legislation to Unionize CA’s 556,000 Fast Food Workers

‘Extreme’ Weather Hysteria is Latest Crisis

Latest Attack on Proposed Sites Reservoir – Not Enough Water

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s In-Laws Fled California for Florida During Covid

Lawmakers Just Passed Two Bills to Punish Physicians and Curtail Free Speech

Two Gun Control Bills Fail on Final Day of 2022 California Legislative Session

Sacramento Starbucks Closes Over Crime and Safety Issues

Through the Green Looking Glass at California’s Electrical Grid

Sen. Hertzberg Warned He Would Bring the Zero-Bail Bill Back – And He Just Did

California to Ban the Sale of Gas Powered Vehicles in just 13 Years

Amendment to Hold Drug Dealers Accountable for Fentanyl Deaths Rejected by Senate Democrats

Gov. Newsom Signs Bill to Re-define State’s Open Meeting Act

Senate Votes Down Amendment to Bill To Make Human Trafficking a Serious, Violent Felony

Three Courts Rule Against Gov. Newsom, State Govt. in Covid Business Lockdown Orders

Why is Gov. Newsom Pushing Stricter Climate and Energy Goals?

Sacramento ‘Antifa’ Teacher Indoctrinating Students in Marxism/Communism Receives 3 years’ Pay to Resign

Union Sponsored AB 5 Hits Independent Truckers

Sen. Scott Wiener Chosen as Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Monkeypox

After Killing Delta Tunnels in 2019, Gov. Newsom Resurrects the Behemoth Jobs Project

Disney Pays the Price for Woke Activism

California’s Oil and Gas Workers Send Warning to States About Newsom’s Devastating Energy Policies

The Possible 2024 Presidential Run of Governor Gavin Newsom

AG Bonta Restricts Four More States for State-Funded Travel Over Anti-LGBTQ Policies

The California Nanny State Invades Household Kitchens

Calif. Attorney General Leaks Names and Addresses of State’s Legal Gun Owners Following SCOTUS Gun Ruling

AB 2098: CA Doctors Who Spread COVID ‘Misinformation’ Risk Losing License to Practice

Calif. Assembly Passes Abortion Rights Constitutional Amendment Bill for Nov. Ballot

Gov. Newsom and Democrats Fast-Track New Gun Control Bills

California Tops Nation’s Highest Gas Prices at $6.43 Per Gallon

Tulare County DA Warns of Fallout with Reduced Sentences for Gang Crimes

Why Did Gov. Newsom Sign Climate Deal With New Zealand?

EXCLUSIVE: California Globe Interview With 45th President Donald Trump

Bill to let 12-Year Olds Get Vaccine Without Parental Consent Passes State Senate

California Refuses to Give Up ‘Woke Math’

California’s Under-21 Firearms Sale Ban Overturned in 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

California Legislature Continues to Restrict Lobbyist and Public Access to Capitol Hearings

AB 2777: ‘The Sexual Abuse Cover Up Accountability Act’

COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate Pulled For K-12 Students Until July 2023

California Public School Enrollment Drops by Another 110,000 Students – Fifth Decline in a Row

Judge Tosses Out California Law Mandating Diversity Quotas on Boards

Mayor and Governor Blame Gun Violence When 6 are Killed, 10 Injured in Downtown Sacramento Shooting

California’s Water Crisis Lingers as Gov. Newsom Vacations in Costa Rica

Sen. Portantino Authors Bill to Force Parents to Disclose Guns in the Home

Political Vendetta or ‘Public Nuisance’: Santa Barbara Chick-fil-A Under Fire

The Expanding Housing Crisis: Affordable, Attainable, or Impossible?

Calif. Senate Clings to Mask Mandate Even as Gov. Announces He’s Dropping It

Gavin Newsom’s Lithium Valley – Spinning Yet Another Field of Dreams

New Wealth Tax Proposal in California in Assembly Bill 2289

San Francisco Voters Recall Three School Board Members With Over 70% of the Vote Each

LA Mayor Eric Garcetti, Celebrities Shown Attending Super Bowl Sans Required Masks

‘MaskGate’ and the Unserious Politicians Mocking the People of California

BLM Shuts Down Online Fundraising in California, Washington Following State AG Warnings

Oakland Votes to Require Proof of Vaccination at Restaurants, Businesses Starting February 1st

Bill To Convert Municipal Golf Courses to Affordable Housing Killed In Assembly Committee

Gov. Newsom Shocked California Looks Like ‘a Third World Country’

Click here to read the full article in the California Globe

State to Mail Debit Cards for Last Round of Inflation Relief

If you still have not received your California inflation relief payment, it could be on its way in the new year.

All direct deposit payments from the Middle Class Tax Refund program have been issued, according to the California Franchise Tax Board, and the remaining payouts will be sent as debit cards expected to be mailed out by Jan. 14.

The eligible residents yet to receive their debit cards are those who received their state-issued pandemic stimulus payments through direct deposit but changed their banking information after filing their 2020 taxes, according to the Franchise Tax Board.

As of Thursday, the state has issued more than 7 million direct deposits and more than 8 million debit cards for a total of $8.4 billion — representing most of the $9.5 billion set aside for the tax refund program meant to help Californians with the soaring cost of gasoline, groceries and other goods over recent months.

The payments range from $200 to $1,050, depending on filing status and claimed dependents.

California began sending funds in early October, and direct deposits were completed by mid-November.

Am I eligible to get money through the California Middle Class Tax Refund?

There are several important qualifications to keep in mind. According to the state Franchise Tax Board, eligible Californians must:

Have filed a 2020 tax return by Oct. 15, 2021.

Meet California’s adjusted gross income limits of $500,000 or less, with tiers depending on AGI.

Not have been claimed as a dependent in the 2020 tax year.

Have been a California resident for at least six months in the 2020 tax year and be a resident on the date the payment is issued.

Am I supposed to receive a debit card?

It depends on how you filed your 2020 income tax return and whether you still have the same bank account.

If you filed your 2020 income tax return electronically but have since changed your bank or account number, then you will receive a debit card.

When should the money arrive?

Click here to read the full article in the LA Times

Riverside Co. Deputy Fatally Shot in Jurupa Valley, Suspect Killed Following Pursuit on 15 Freeway

RIVERSIDE COUNTY, Calif. – A deputy with the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department died after being shot by a suspect during a traffic stop in Jurupa Valley

The suspect was later shot and killed by deputies following a pursuit that ended on the 15 Freeway.

The deputy was identified as 32-year-old Isaiah Cordero. Cordero was a motor enforcement deputy assigned to the city of Jurupa Valley.

According to Sheriff Chad Bianco, Deputy Cordero was shot during a traffic stop around 2 p.m. Thursday in the 3900 block of Golden West Avenue. He attempted to pull over a driver and as he approached the vehicle the suspect pointed a gun and shot Cordero. 

Witnesses called 911 and stayed with the deputy till paramedics arrived. The suspect, later identified as William Shae McKay, fled the area setting off a massive manhunt. 

McKay was later located in San Bernardino County and when deputies attempted to approach him, he fled, triggering a pursuit. 

The pursuit, which spanned from San Bernardino to Riverside counties, came to a violent end after the suspect vehicle crashed and became disabled along the 15 Freeway in Norco

According to Sheriff Bianco, McKay fired multiple rounds at deputies at the end of the pursuit. Deputies returned fire, striking McKay. 

The suspect did not die at the scene, but was treated and transported to the hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

Both deadly shootings remain under investigation. It is unknown what the suspect was initially wanted for when authorities initiated the traffic stop.

Mckay,44, has an extensive criminal history which includes kidnapping, robbery, multiple assaults with a deadly weapon, and the stabbing of a CHP K9. 

RELATED: Deputy Isaiah Cordero death: Sheriff says ‘we would not be here today if judge had done her job’

“This terrible tragedy should have been prevented by the legal system. McKay has an extensive and violent past and was convicted of a third strike in November of 2021. Instead of sentencing him to 25 years to life, which should have happened, the judge lowered his bail, allowing him to be released,” Bianco said during a press conference. 

“We would not be here today if that judge had done her job,” he added. 

Hundreds of law enforcement personnel gathered outside Riverside Community Hospital Thursday evening to hold a procession for the fallen deputy. Draped with the American flag, the deputy’s casket was taken from the hospital and put in a Hearse where dozens of patrol cars followed it from behind. 

The Riverside Sheriff’s Association released the following statement, “We are devastated by the grief of losing Deputy Isaiah Cordero, a deputy who was a ray of sunshine in the Riverside Sheriff’s Department, a person who was dedicated to protecting others. Once again, we face a tragic reminder of the selflessness and unwavering courage required of peace officers and their families. Deputy Cordero put on his uniform daily to make a difference in his community and keep families safe. Deputy Cordero’s death leaves a tremendous hole in the hearts of so many people who had the chance to know him personally.”

Cordero started working for the sheriff’s department in May of 2014 as a correctional officer for the Robert Presley Detention Center as well as worked at the Larry Smith Correctional Center and the Indio Jail. In February of 2018 h began the 204 Basic Academy and was promoted to a sworn deputy sheriff. In September of 2022 he completed motor school.

“From the day he was hired, his goal was to become a motor deputy. Deputy Cordero learned from his mother the value of serving and helping others,” Bianco said. 

Click here to read the full article at FoxNews LA